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Black News and Black Views with a Whole Lotta Attitude

Kendrick Lamar Breaks Another Record

Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers is the first rap album to reach a billion streams on Spotify in 2022.

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Photo: Jason Koerner (Getty Images)

He’s done it again. Mr. Morale continues to impress rap fans with his lyrics, rhyme style and the records he keeps on breaking.

Nearly five months after the release of Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers, the rapper’s fifth studio album has become the first rap album to reach one billion streams on Spotify in 2022, according to Chart Data.

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With the help of popular tracks such as “N95,” “Die Hard,” and “Rich Spirit” the Compton rapper has been streamed more than any other rap album in 2022, which is an impressive feat considering Drake, Future, Gunna and Lil Durk have all dropped popular projects this year.

K. Dot’s fifth studio album has also sold more than 500,000 units in the U.S., according to Chart Data. Meaning Lamar will be getting a gold plaque from the RIAA soon.

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Meanwhile, the “Auntie Diaries” rapper is on his “Big Steppers” tour throughout America and Europe. LeBron James and his wife, Savannah, were seen over the weekend taking in a show in Vancouver turning up with Lamar and his cousin, Baby Keem.

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In a tweet, the NBA superstar wrote, “Vancouver!! Thank you for the hospitality over the weekend. 1st time in your beautiful, wonderful city! @kendricklamar you’re 1 of a kind my brother! SPECIAL show by a SPECIAL person! Appreciate the love!”

On top of being one of the most streamed artists in the world, Lamar could also be Oscar-nominated soon. We Cry Together is a short film for the song of the same name which co-stars Lamar and Taylour Paige acting out the tumultuous breakup from the track.

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Per Academy rules that every movie eligible for an Academy Award must screen for at least one week in Los Angeles or New York City before the end of the year, We Cry Together played June 3-9 at the Laemmle Royal Theater in West LA. It held one screening a day in the 180-seat main theater for those involved in the project, their family and friends, as well as the select few who were able to get tickets. Phones were confiscated to make sure the screening was kept private.