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Black News and Black Views with a Whole Lotta Attitude

Minneapolis Mayor Officially Prohibits Execution of No-Knock Warrants [UPDATED]

Minneapolis Police Department will no longer be allowed to request no-knock warrants or respond to similar searches from other cities.

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Mayor Jacob Frey gives a speech at the Jefe Urban Cocina restaurant on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021, in Minneapolis. Frey on Monday, March 14, 2022, announced a new policy for search warrants following the police shooting of a Black man in a downtown apartment, with officers required to knock and wait a certain length of time before entering a residence. The city’s warrant policy came under scrutiny after a SWAT team shot and killed Amir Locke, 22, in early February.
Mayor Jacob Frey gives a speech at the Jefe Urban Cocina restaurant on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021, in Minneapolis. Frey on Monday, March 14, 2022, announced a new policy for search warrants following the police shooting of a Black man in a downtown apartment, with officers required to knock and wait a certain length of time before entering a residence. The city’s warrant policy came under scrutiny after a SWAT team shot and killed Amir Locke, 22, in early February.
Photo: Christian Monterrosa (AP)

Updated as of 4/6/2022 9:30 a.m ET

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey announced a new policy prohibiting the execution of no-knock warrants, reported CNN. Minneapolis Police Department will not be able to request no-knock search warrants and must follow a new protocol when executing a search warrant.

The mayor’s previous policy requires police to repeatedly knock, announce themselves and their purpose before entering a premises, per CNN’s report. Police are ordered to wait 20 second before entering a residence during the day and 30 seconds if issuing a warrant at night. The policy also requires police officers to wear body cameras during the execution of a search warrant.

Following the shooting and killing of Amir Locke by Minneapolis police who were issuing a no-knock warrant, Locke’s family and city residents demanded a change in search warrant policy.

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About Locke’s case from AP News:

The city’s warrant policy came under scrutiny after a SWAT team shot and killed Amir Locke, 22, in early February. Body camera video showed an officer using a key to unlock the door of a downtown apartment and enter without knocking, followed by at least four officers in uniform and protective vests, shortly before 7 a.m.

The video recorded police shouting “Police, search warrant!” and “Get on the ground!” and showed an officer kicking a sectional sofa. Locke, who was wrapped in a comforter on the sofa, is seen beginning to move, holding a pistol, and three shots are heard.

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Locke was reportedly licensed to carry and was not a resident of the apartment where he was found. Though a new policy will not undo the actions of these officers, Locke’s family said in a statement they were looking forward to the proposal.

The policy will extend to warrants carried out for other agencies and for those requested to be carried out in other cities, per AP News. Mayor Frey said the policy isn’t a complete ban of no-knock warrants and may still be allowed during pressing circumstances.

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“This policy is among the most forward-looking and extensive in the nation and will help keep both our residents and officers safe,” said Frey in a statement, via CNN.