Photo: Andrew Harnik (Getty Images)

Despite several outbursts from protesters, Congress voted 50 to 48 to confirm embattled judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, ending weeks of contentiousness between those who believe sexual assault survivors and those who live and represent states that sought to continue slavery.

“I do not consent, where’s my representation?” one yelled.

“Shame!” yelled another.

Kavanaugh’s confirmation comes after several allegations of sexual misconduct, which led to protests and several undecided senators being confronted by sexual assault survivors in hopes of swaying them to vote against the president’s nominee.

Expect a Trump Twitter victory lap as Kavanaugh marks a huge win for the president, who has now nominated his second Supreme Court judge in the short time since Russia stole the election from the people and placed their most favorite operative into the White House.

Wait, it looks like he’s already sent it out.

Advertisement

Clearly someone wrote this tweet for the president and just asked him to push it out as everything looks to be spelled properly.

The moments before the vote were met with protesters gathered outside the Capitol hoping for a last second call to conscious.

According to CNN:

Large groups of protesters gathered outside the Capitol building and across the street at the Supreme Court ahead of the final vote on Saturday. People on the steps of the Capitol chanted “vote them out!” and “the whole world is watching,” messages that at times met with jeers and boos from others in the crowd.

As the clock ticked down to a final vote, Republican and Democratic senators continued to give floor speeches debating the nomination. In a sign of the tense mood at the Capitol, Republican Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas was interrupted twice by yelling from protesters in the Senate gallery, which is open to visitors. Earlier in the day, Cornyn told a group of reporters that this has “not been the Senate’s finest hour,” and said that “a better path forward” is needed.

Advertisement

Reports of Kavanaugh’s misbehavior continue to emerge, even as the vote was taking place.

Just an hour before Kavanaugh’s confirmation, The Washington Post reported that “Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. has received more than a dozen judicial misconduct complaints against Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh in recent weeks but has chosen for the time being not to refer them to a judicial panel for investigation.”

A judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit — the court on which Kavanaugh serves — sent a string of complaints to Roberts starting three weeks ago, according to four people familiar with the matter.

That judge, Karen LeCraft Henderson, had dismissed other complaints against Kavanaugh as frivolous, but she concluded that some were substantive enough that they should not be handled by Kavanaugh’s fellow judges in the D.C. Circuit.

In a statement Saturday, Henderson acknowledged the complaints and said they centered on statements Kavanaugh made during his Senate confirmation hearings.

Under the law, “any person may file a misconduct complaint in the circuit in which the federal judge sits,” she said in the statement. “The complaints do not pertain to any conduct in which Judge Kavanaugh engaged as a judge. The complaints seek investigations only of the public statements he has made as a nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States.”

Advertisement

But it was clear from the onset that this Republican cake had already been baked. Kavanaugh was going to become a Supreme Court justice and while it’s easy to place blame on the senators that appeared to be conflicted over their vote for Kavanaugh, never forget that 53 percent of white women voted against their self-interest to vote for Trump.

There’s enough blame to go around.