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It has been 1,277 days since the people of Flint, Mich., have had clean water in their pipes. In that time, they have continued to suffer the aftereffects of an extreme example of environmental racism. The City Council was supposed to decide on a permanent source of water by Monday, but once again, that decision is on hold.

The City Council asked federal Judge David Lawson, who set Monday’s deadline, to give it more time to decide on a new source of water for the city. According to the Associated Press, Lawson, in turn, asked the state of Michigan to file a reply to the city’s request by Tuesday, effectively extending the deadline for at least one more day.

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The City Council previously refused to approve a 30-year contract with Great Lakes Water Authority out of Detroit before a June 26 deadline that was imposed by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. In response, the state filed a lawsuit against the city of Flint, alleging that the city is endangering public health.

The city has previously alleged that the state was bullying the council into approving the 30-year deal with GLWA.

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Although Flint Mayor Karen Weaver supports signing the long-term contract with GLWA, the council said in September that it had not had enough time to determine whether or not the GLWA deal would be less expensive than treating water from the new Karegnondi Water Authority pipeline.

“I thought everyone was concerned about bullying tactics when it comes to our children,” 8th Ward Councilwoman Vicki VanBuren told MLive-Flint Journal in September. “When it comes to the state, it’s like they’ve never heard of it. It’s their way or nothing. ... Maybe they think after they get this done, they can leave Flint.”

It was while Flint was under the control of a state-appointed emergency manager that the switch to the Flint River as a water supply was made in April 2014. The corrosive water from the river was not properly treated, causing lead to leach into the water.

Read more at the Associated Press.