Photo: Mark Wilson (Getty Images)

This is your regular reminder that the current sitting president of the United States is a racist, xenophobic rape apologist who protects and promotes abusers.

He doesn’t protect all abusers mind you; he protects those who look like him, think like him and have a socio-economic status that matches his. Everyone else can go to hell or die as far as he is concerned.

Case in point:

Speaking on the situation with his Supreme Court nominee—Judge Brett Kavanaugh—Trump told reporters at the White House:

“Well, it’s a tough thing going on. If you can be an exemplary person for 35 years, and then somebody comes and they say you did this or that, and they give three witnesses, and the three witnesses—at this point—do not corroborate what she was saying. It’s a very scary situation where you’re guilty until proven innocent. My whole life ... my whole life I’ve heard you’re innocent until proven guilty, but now you’re guilty until proven innocent. That is a very, very difficult standard.”

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A reporter asked Trump what he would say to young men in America at this time, to which Trump replied, “Well I say that it’s a very scary time for young men in America when you can be guilty of something that you may not be guilty of.

“This is a very difficult time. What’s happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a Supreme Court justice. It really does. You could be someone that was perfect your entire life, and somebody could accuse you of something. Doesn’t necessarily have to be a woman, as everybody says. But somebody could accuse you of something and you are automatically guilty. But in this realm, you are truly guilty until proven innocent,” Trump added.

It’s interesting that Trump has this to say in the wake of all the accusations coming forward about Kavanaugh.

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As he was reminded by actor and comedian Patton Oswalt, Trump definitely took the opposite stance in 1989 when the Central Park 5—then teenagers—were falsely accused of brutally raping a woman in New York City. In fact, the businessman spent $85,000 of his own money placing full-page ads in the four daily New York newspapers calling for the return of the death penalty. And lest you want to argue that he was only acting on the information everyone had at the time, the coerced confessions of scared teenagers who had been hammered and bullied by New York City police officers, please know this: he doubled down on his position when asked about it by CNN in October 2016.

“They admitted they were guilty,” Trump said, ignoring the fact that they were exonerated by both DNA evidence which cleared their names and a detailed confession by the true perpetrator, Matias Reyes. “The police doing the original investigation say they were guilty. The fact that that case was settled with so much evidence against them is outrageous.”

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Your president’s opinions are not even hinged in reality.

Donald Trump is not worried about all of the young men in America. He is worried about young white men—and specifically young, rich, white men who he sees as potential victims of being held accountable for their poor behavior.

Trump probably cursed the conviction of Brock Turner, and were it not a state cause, he would likely try to pardon him, because that’s the kind of sick troll your president is.

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White men and boys—especially those who grow up with affluenza—are raised to believe that they never truly have to be accountable for their actions. There is always some way to get out of whatever trouble they are in whether it be their parents’ money or influence or friends in high places—they can get away with murder or sexual assault or whatever the case may be.

With all the accusations coming out about Kavanaugh and the American people taking notice of the way the GOP is trying to sweep the entire situation under the rug while simultaneously pushing forward with his nomination, Trump is crying foul because it appears that his Supreme Court pick may actually have to face the music for something he did in his misspent youth.

The reality of that is probably scary for them both. There are a lot of accusations still floating around out there about your president too. If his Supreme Court pick can get taken out of the paint, things probably don’t bode that well for the president himself either, right?

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The bottom line is your president—and a lot of white men just like him—are afraid of the way the tide of accountability seems to be turning.

Rightfully so, it would seem.