We Stand in Solidarity With Nikole Hannah-Jones

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Writer/Author Nikole Hannah-Jones attends the 34th Brooklyn Tribute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. held at BAM Howard Gilman Opera House on January 20, 2020 in the Brooklyn section of New York City.
Writer/Author Nikole Hannah-Jones attends the 34th Brooklyn Tribute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. held at BAM Howard Gilman Opera House on January 20, 2020 in the Brooklyn section of New York City.
Photo: mpi43/MediaPunch /IPX (AP)

We, the undersigned, believe this country stands at a crucial moment that will define the democratic expression and exchange of ideas for our own and future generations. State institutions across the country are attempting to ban frank and rigorous conversation about our history in the classroom. Few single works have been threatened with more restrictions than the 1619 Project, a landmark exploration of America’s deep roots in enslavement. And now, the 1619 Project’s founder, Nikole Hannah-Jones, has had her appointment as the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill with tenure blocked by its Board of Trustees.

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Hannah-Jones’ accolades are numerous: three National Magazine awards, one Peabody award, two Polk awards, a Pulitzer and a MacArthur Fellowship. Hannah-Jones has been elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Society of American Historians. Because of her extraordinary achievements, the Hussman School recruited Hannah-Jones, one of the school’s most notable alumni, intending to appoint her a professor with tenure. Hannah-Jones underwent the university’s rigorous tenure review process, which included enthusiastic support from the Hussman School faculty, her journalistic peers among them. The failure of courage on the part of the Board of Trustees to follow the recommendation of Hannah-Jones’ peers is almost certainly tied to Hannah-Jones’ creation of the 1619 Project.

While the denial of tenure is egregious, it is not an isolated incident. The same anti-democratic thinking that blocked Hannah-Jones’ appointment at her alma mater has also fueled efforts in state and local legislatures to ban the teaching of histories of slavery and its legacies through the 1619 Project. We call on all people of conscience to decry this growing wave of repression and to encourage a recommitment to the free exchange of ideas in our schools, workplaces, legislatures, and communities.

We are called to action by the example Hannah-Jones herself has set during her nearly twenty-year career as a journalist committed to shedding light on inequality and injustice through an examination of one of democracy’s fundamental building blocks, education. Writing first for outlets in Durham, North Carolina, and Portland, Oregon, Hannah-Jones joined the New York Times Magazine in 2015 as a staff reporter. Throughout her life, she has unflinchingly unearthed the blueprints of racism, its latticework of law, policy and custom, and how it undergirds our everyday lives. Her work is a call to conscience and a call to action for all Americans who remain committed to a democracy premised in unrestricted opportunity and unbridled attainment in public education for all.

Thwarted in her school’s efforts to appoint Hannah-Jones as a fully tenured member of her faculty, Hussman School Dean Susan King announced in May 2021 that the appointment would be instead for a renewable five-year term. She explained: “Now one of the most respected investigative journalists in America will be working with our students on projects that will move their careers forward and ignite critically important conversations.” Still, as news of the Board’s deliberate inaction surfaced this past week, observers decried it. Dr. Jelani Cobb, historian and professor at Columbia University School of Journalism, urged during a television interview that we stand at a “real crossroads between academic freedom and freedom of the press.” There has to be “vocal and vociferous opposition from various quarters.” We agree.

The threat to learning and the exchange of ideas persists, especially in places where it is proposed that the 1619 Project be taught in public schools. At risk right now are opportunities for thousands of students across the nation to think more deeply about the year 1619 and the defining role of slavery in U.S. history. Right wing critics, pundits, and politicians have launched a coordinated campaign to suppress this essential historical inquiry. Proposed bills such as South Dakota’s vague “act to prohibit the use of curricular materials that promote racial divisiveness” quickly appeared, but Arkansas’ HB1231 is more literally named, “To Prohibit the Use of Public School Funds to Teach the 1619 Project.” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell singled out the 1619 Project in a scathing letter condemning the Biden administration’s proposal to teach about racism and slavery’s legacy in the nation’s public schools. But the threat of state suppression does not end with the 1619 Project. Todd Rokita, Indiana Attorney General, wrote to the Biden administration to argue that they shouldn’t be “imposing the deeply flawed and radical teachings of critical race theory into the classroom.” At least 19 other states’ attorneys general have signed it. Currently, eight states have pending bills that will limit teachers (and some state contractors) from teaching anti-racism or anti-sexism, most by banning classroom material and censoring discussion. Our right and our children’s right to learn is under siege.

We decry this rising tide of suppression and the threat to academic freedom that it embodies. Some of us will call upon our university administrators, public school superintendents, principals, teachers, and faculty unions and senates to issue statements of support for the freedom of ideas in the classroom. Others of us will urge philanthropic foundations to look twice at state institutions that betray that freedom. The artists, performers, and speakers below may decline invitations from institutions that suppress free thought about racism and its historical roots. We will take our views with us to the ballot box and hold local, state and national politicians accountable to the free exchange of ideas and academic freedom. We, our children, young scholars, and our country deserve no less.

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We will cheer Nikole Hannah-Jones on when she steps into her classroom at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill this fall. But we will not turn away from the regrettable circumstances under which she will do so. The University’s Board of Trustees has failed to uphold the first order values of academic freedom and the free exchange of ideas. And too many lawmakers have wrongly deemed it their role to reach into classrooms and tell educators what to teach and how to teach it.

Here, in 2021, we urge you and one another to resist.

Signed,

Affiliations for identification purposes only

Ta-Nehisi Coates, Writer

Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore, Peter V. & C. Vann Woodward Professor of History Emerita, Yale University

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Martha S. Jones, Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor, Professor of History and the SNF Agora Institute, The Johns Hopkins University

A’Lelia Bundles, Author and Founder, Madam Walker Family Archive

Ada Ferrer, Julius Silver Professor of History and Latin American & Caribbean Studies, New York University

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Ademola Okulaja, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Adriane Lentz-Smith, Associate Professor of History and African and African American Studies, Duke University

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Alan Taylor, University of Virginia

Alia Hanna Habib, Literary Agent, The Gernert Company

Allison Pugh, Professor of Sociology and Chair, Department of Women, Gender and Sexuality, University of Virginia

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Allyson Hobbs, Associate Professor of American History, Director of African & African American Studies, Stanford University

Amrita Chakrabarti Myers, Ph.D., Ruth N. Halls Associate Professor of History and Gender Studies, Indiana University, Bloomington

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Andre Iguodala, NBA Player

Andrea Chung, Artist

Andrew Horowitz, Assistant Professor of History, Tulane University

Angela Y. Davis, Distinguished Professor Emerita, Humanities Division, UC Santa Cruz

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Angela Rye, CEO, IMPACT Strategies, Host On 1 with Angela Rye

Anthea Butler, Interim Chair of Religious Studies, Associate Chair of Religion and African American Studies, University of Pennsylvania

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Anthony Tolliver, NBA Player

Ariela J. Gross, John B. & Alice R. Sharp Professor of Law & History, University of Southern California

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Ashley Dai, Former UNC athlete, tennis

Ashley Lim, Former UNC athlete, rowing

Ava DuVernay, Filmmaker

Barbara Ransby, John D. MacArthur Endowed Chair in Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Distinguished Professor of Black Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies and History, University of Illinois at Chicago

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Barry Jenkins, Filmmaker

Ben Alpers, Associate Professor, Honors College, University of Oklahoma

Benjamin Talton, Associate Professor of History, Temple University

Benjamin Lawrance, Professor of History, University of Arizona

Black Thought, Artist

Brandon Terry, Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies and of Social Studies, Harvard University

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Brenda Elsey, Professor of History, Hofstra University

Brenda E. Stevenson, Nikoll Family Endowed Chair of History, UCLA; Inaugural Hillary Rodham Clinton Chair of Women’s History, Oxford University

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Brianna Pinto, Former UNC athlete, soccer

Brittany Packnett Cunningham, Activist, Educator, Host & Executive Producer, UNDISTRACTED

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Brittany West, Former UNC athlete, softball

Brittney Cooper, Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Africana Studies, Rutgers University

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Bruce Dorsey, Swarthmore College

Bryn Boylan, Former UNC athlete, field hockey

Caitlin Rosenthal, Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley

Calida Rawles, Artist

Calvin Schermerhorn, Arizona State University

Candace Cooper, Former UNC athlete, track & field

Carina Ray, Associate Professor of African and African American Studies, Brandeis University

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Carl Suddler, Emory University

Carmelo Anthony, NBA Player, Social Change Fund United

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Core Faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies, University of New Hampshire

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Charles W. McKinney, Jr., Neville Frierson Bryan Chair of Africana Studies, Professor of History, Rhodes College

Cherisse Jones-Branch, PhD, James and Wanda Lee Vaughn Endowed Professor of History, Arkansas State University

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Chris Jackson, One World

Chris Paul, NBA Player, Social Change Fund United

Christina Greer, Associate Professor of Political Science, Fordham University

Christina Wolbrecht, Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame

Christopher McKnight Nichols, Associate Professor of History and Director, Center for the Humanities, Oregon State University

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CJ McCollum, NBA Player

Claire Bond Potter, The New School for Social Research

Claudia Rankine, Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry, Yale University

Clint Smith, Writer

Cole Anthony, NBA Player

Cornel West, Union Theological Seminary

Courtnie Williamson, Former UNC athlete, field hockey

Crystal N. Feimster, Associate Professor, Department of African American Studies, Yale University

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Crystal R. Sanders, PhD, Associate Professor of History, Pennsylvania State University

Cynthia Lyerly, Associate Professor, Boston College

Dahlia Lithwick, Senior Legal Correspondent, Slate, Host Amicus podcast

Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas

Danny Green, NBA Player

Daphne Brooks, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of African American Studies, American Studies, Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies and Music, Yale University

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Darryl Pinckney, Writer

Davarian L. Baldwin, Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of American Studies, Trinity College

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David Blight, Sterling Professor of History and Director, Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, Yale University

David Silkenat, Senior Lecturer, University of Edinburgh

Deborah E. Roberts, Artist

Deborah E. McDowell, Director, Carter Woodson Institute, Alice Griffin Professor of English, University of Virginia

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Derek Fordjour, Artist

Devin Bellamy, Former UNC athlete, swim/dive

Doc Rivers, NBA Coach

Dolen Perkins-Valdez, Associate Professor of Literature, American University

Donna Brazile, Adjunct Lecturer, Georgetown University. Former Chairwoman, Democratic National Committee.

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Douglas Foster, Associate Professor, Northwestern University

Dr. Cynthia Greenlee, UNC ‘96, Hussman 2000

Dwyane Wade, Retired NBA Player, Social Change Fund United

Ed Geth, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Eddie S. Glaude Jr., James S McDonnell Distinguished University Professor, Princeton University

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Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Duke University

Edward B. Rugemer, Asscciate Professor of History and African American Studies, Yale University

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Elizabeth Herbin-Triant, Associate Professor of History, University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Elizabeth Hinton, Associate Professor of History and African American Studies and Professor of Law, Yale University

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Ellen D. Wu, Ph.D., Associate Professor, History, Indiana University Bloomington

Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History, Columbia University

Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Charles and Mary Beard Distinguished Professor of History, Rutgers University

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Eve L. Ewing, Assistant Professor, University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Victor S. Thomas Professor of History and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

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Evelynn M. Hammonds, Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science. Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Evette Dionne, Editor-in-chief, Bitch Media

Ezra Baeli-Wang, Former UNC athlete, fencing

Françoise Hamlin, Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies, Brown University

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Frank Cogliano, Professor of American History, University of Edinburgh

Frederick Wherry, Townsend Martin, Class of 1917 Professor of Sociology, Princeton University and Director, Dignity + Debt

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Garrett Temple, NBA Player

George Lynch, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Grace Elizabeth Hale, Commonwealth Chair of American Studies and History, University of Virginia

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Greg Carr, Professor and Chair, Department of Afro-American Studies and Adjunct Professor, School of Law, Howard University

Harrison Barnes, NBA Player

Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Associate Professor of History, The Ohio State University

Hazel V. Carby, Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor Emeritus of African American Studies, Professor Emeritus of African American Studies, Yale University

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Heather Andrea Williams, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, Department of Africana Studies, University of Pennsylvania

Heather Ann Thompson, Pulitzer Prize Recipient, Professor of History, University of Michigan

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Henry Farrell, SNF Agora Professor of International Affairs, The Johns Hopkins University

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University

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Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, Professor, University of Oklahoma

Imani Perry, Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies, Princeton University

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Jacqueline Goldsby, Professor of English and African American Studies, Chair Department of African American Studies, Yale University

Jacqueline Jones, Ellen C. Temple Chair in Women’s History and Mastin Gentry White Professor of Southern History, University of Texas at Austin

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Jacqueline Woodson, Writer

Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, Julia Cherry Spruill Professor Emerita, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

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James Smethurst, Professor of Afro-American History, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Janelle Bailey, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Jason Stanley, Jacob Urowsky Professor of Philosophy, Yale University

Jawad Williams, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Jean Allman, Professor of African and African American Studies, Washington University in St. Louis

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Jelani Cobb, PhD, Columbia School of Journalism

Jenee Desmond-Harris, Writer and Editor

Jeneé Osterheldt, Columnist, Boston Globe. Harvard Neiman Fellow, 2017

Jenna Wortham, Writer

Jennifer Trent Parker, Editor

Jerry Gershenhorn, Julius Chambers Professor of History, North Carolina Central University

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Jesmyn Ward, Writer

Jesse Weaver Shipley, Professor of African and African American Studies, Dartmouth University

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Jim Downs, Gilder Lehrman-National Endowment for the Humanities Professor of Civil War Studies and History, Gettysburg College

John H. Bracey , W. E. B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

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Jonathan Cooper, Former UNC athlete, football

Jonathan Daniel Wells, Professor of Residential College, DAAS, and History, University of Michigan

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Jonathan Earle, PhD, Dean, Roger Hadfield Ogden Honors College, Louisiana State University

Joseph Winters, Duke University

Joshua D. Rothman, Professor of History, University of Alabama

Josie Duffy-Rice, Writer

Joy Reid, “The Reid Out,” MSNBC Political Analyst and Hearst Visiting Professor, Howard University, Spring 2021

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Judith Weisenfeld, Princeton University

Judy Wu, Director of the Humanities Center, Professor of Asian American Studies, Chancellor’s Fellow, University of California, Irvine

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Jules Micchia, Former UNC athlete, rowing

Kamilah Forbes, Television and Theater Director and Producer

Karen Graubart, Association Professor of History, University of Notre Dame

Karen L. Cox, Professor of History, University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Karl Jacoby, Allan Nevins Professor of History, Columbia University

Karla Holloway, Ph.D., James B. Duke Professor Emerita, Duke University

Karsonya Wise Whitehead, Associate Professor of Communication and African and African American Studies and Founding Director of the Karson Institute for Race, Peace, and Social Justice, Loyola University Maryland

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Katherine Mellen Charron, Associate Professor of History, North Caroina State University

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Professor of African American Studies, Princeton University

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Keisha Blain, Associate Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh

Kellie Carter Jackson, Knafel Assistant Professor of the Humanities, Department of Africana Studies, Wellesley College

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Kenny Williams, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Kevin Gaines, Julian Bond Professor of Civil Rights and Social Justice, Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia

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Kevin M. Kruse, Princeton University

Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Harvard Kennedy School

Khara Vassell, Former UNC athlete, soccer

Kidada E. Williams, Associate Professor of History, Wayne State University

Kim Gallon, Associate Professor of History, Purdue University

Kimberlé Crenshaw, Distinguished Professor of Law and Promise Institute Chair in Human Rights, UCLA Law, and Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School

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Kimberly Atkins, Columnist, Boston Globe

Kobena Mercer, Professor of African American Studies and History of Art, Yale University

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Konstantin Dierks, Department of History, Indiana University

Kristin Hall, Former UNC athlete, track & field

Kyle Guy, NBA Player

Leah Wright Rigueur, Harry Truman Associate Professor of American History, Brandeis University

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Leigh Raiford, Associate Professor of African American Studies, University of California at Berkeley

Lena Waithe, Writer

Leslie M. Alexander, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Arizona State University

Leslie M. Harris, Professor of History and African American Studies, Northwestern University

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Leslie Odom Jr., Actor, Producer

Liette Gidlow, Harvard Radcliffe Institute ‘20, Professor of History, Wayne State University

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Lila Corwin Berman, Director of the Feinstein Center for Jewish Studies and Professor of History, Temple University

Linda Villarosa, Assistant Professor, The City College of New York

Maboula Soumahoro, University of Tours

Mady Clahane, Former UNC athlete, track & field

Maggie Auslander, Former UNC athlete, lacrosse

Malcolm Brogdon, NBA Player

Malinda Maynor Lowery, Professor of History and Director of the Center for the Study of the American South, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

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Manisha Sinha, Draper Chair in American History, University of Connecticut

Marcus Krah, Former UNC athlete, track & field

Marcus Paige, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Marilyn Richardson, Writer

Mark Anthony Neal, Ph.D., Duke University

Marlene Daut, Professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies, University of Virginia

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Martha Biondi, Lorraine H. Morton Professor of African American Studies and Professor of History, Northwestern University

Martha Hodes, New York University

Marvin Williams, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Mary Pattillo, Harold Washington Professor of Sociology and African American Studies, Northwestern University

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Matthew Desmond, Maurice P. During Professor of Sociology, Princeton University

Matthew Frye Jacobson, Sterling Professor of American Studies and History, Yale University

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Matthew Guterl, Professor, Africana Studies/American Studies/Ethnic Studies, Brown University

Matthew J. Countryman, Chair, Department of Afroamerican Studies, Associate Professor of Afroamerican Studies and History, University of Michigan

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Melissa Harris-Perry, Maya Angelou Presidential Chair, Wake Forest University and President, Anna Julia Cooper Center

Michael A. Gomez, Silver Professor, Departments of History and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, New York University

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Michele Norris, Journalist

Michelle Alexander, Visiting Professor of Social Justice at Union Theological Seminary

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Michelle Duster, Columbia College Chicago

Michelle Moyd, Associate Professor of History, Indiana University - Bloomington

Mignon Moore, Professor of Sociology, Columbia University

Minkah Makalani, Associate Professor, African and African Diaspora Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

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Molefi Kete Asante, Professor and Chair, Department of Africology and African American Studies, Temple University

N. D. B. Connolly, Herbert Baxter Adams Associate Professor of History, The Johns Hopkins University

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Nancy Kwak, History, UC San Diego

Natalia Molina, Distinguished Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity, University of Southern California

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Natalie Hopkinson, Writer and Scholar

Natalie Moore, Journalist

Natasha Cloud, WNBA Player, Social Change Fund United

Nell Irvin Painter, Edwards Professor of History, Emerita, Princeton University

Nicholas Guyatt, University of Cambridge

Nicole Hemmer, Columbia University

Nikhil Pal Singh, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History, New York University

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Noliwe Rooks, W. E. B. Du Bois Professor, Africana Studies, Cornell University

Nwando Achebe, Jack and Margaret Sweet Endowed Professor of History, Michigan State University

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Olivette Otele, Professor of History of Slavery and Memory of Enslavement, University of Bristol

P. Gabrielle Foreman, Penn State University

Penny Von Eschen, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of American Studies and Professor of History, The University of Virginia

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Quincy Mills, Associate Professor of History, University of Maryland at College Park

Rachel N Klein, Professor, Department of History, University of California, San Diego

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Randal Maurice Jelks, Professor of African and African Studies, University of Kansas

Rebecca Anne Goetz, Associate Professor of History, New York University

Rebecca Carroll, Writer

Rebecca Traister, New York Magazine

Richard Jefferson, Retired NBA Player

Robert Korstad, Professor Emeritus of Public Policy and History, Duke University

Robert Trent Vinson, Professor, Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies

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Ruha Benjamin, Professor of African American Studies, Princeton University

Robin D. G. Kelley, Distinguished Professor and Gary B. Nash Professor in American History, University of California, Los Angeles

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Rochelle Riley, Journalist, University of North Carolina School of Journalism Alumna

Rokhaya Diallo, Journalist, author, and filmmaker

Roxane Gay, Writer

Russell Rickford, Associate Professor of History, Cornell University

Ryan Coogler, Filmmaker

Salah Hassan, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences, Africana Studies and Art History, Cornell University

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Sarah J. Jackson, Presidential Associate Professor, Annenberg School for Communication, and Co-Director, Media, Inequality and Change Center, University of Pennsylvania

Sarah Knott, Sally M. Reahard Professor of History, Indiana University

Seth Curry, NBA Player

Seth Rockman, Associate Professor of History, Brown University

Shammond Williams, Former UNC athlete, basketball

Shawn Leigh Alexander, Professor of African and African American Studies, University of Kansas

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Stephanie Jones-Rogers, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Berkeley

Stephanie McCurry, R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of History in Honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower, Columbia University

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Stephen Berry, Gregory Professor of the Civil War Era, Secretary-Treasurer of the Southern Historical Association, University of Georgia

Stephen Hahn, Professor of History, New York University, President of the Southern Historical Association

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Stephen Kantrowitz, Plaenert-Bascom Professor of History, University of Wisconsin

Steven W. Thrasher, Ph.D., Daniel H. Renberg Chair of Social Justice in Reporting, Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University

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Sunny Hostin, Lawyer, Author and Journalist

Suzanne Nossel, PEN America

Sven Beckert, Laird Bell Professor of History, Harvard University

Talitha LeFlouria, Ph.D., Lisa Smith Discovery Associate Professor, University of Virginia

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Tanisha Ford, Professor of History, The CUNY Graduate Center

Tanya McKinnon, McKinnon Literary

Tayari Jones, Charles Howard Candler Professor of English, Emory University

Tera Hunter, Edwards Professor of American History and African American Studies, Princeton University

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Thandiwe Newton, Actor and Activist

Thomas J. Sugrue, Silver Professor of History and Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University

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Tiffany Cross, Journalist

Timothy Patrick McCarthy, Harvard University

Tiya Miles, Professor of History, Radcliffe Alumnae Professor, Harvard University

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Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School and Professor of History, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Tommie Shelby, Caldwell Titcomb Professor of African and African American Studies and Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University

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Toshi Reagon, Musician, Producer, Activist

Tracey L. Meares, Walton Hale Hamilton Professor, Yale Law School

Tressie McMillan Cottom, Associate Professor and Senior Research Faculty at UNC Chapel Hill and MacArthur Fellow

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Tricia Rose, Chancellor’s Professor of Africana Studies and Director, Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, Brown University

Trymaine Lee, Journalist

Tsitsi Jaji, Duke University

Victoria Saker Woeste, Historian. Affiliated Research Professor, American Bar Foundation

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Virginia Scharff, Distinguished Professor of History Emerita, Department of History, University of New Mexico

W. Caleb McDaniel, Mary Gibbs Jones Professor of Humanities, Professor and Chair of History, Rice University

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Wahneema Lubiano, Associate Professor, Department of African & African American Studies, Duke University

Walter C. Rucker, Professor, Department of African American Studies, Department of History, Emory University

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Walter Johnson, History Department, Harvard University

Wesley Morris, Writer

William Sturkey, Associate Professor of History, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

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Xaviera Simmons, Artist

DISCUSSION

amessagetorudy
BedandBreakfastMan

The people who are opposed to the 1619 Project should be expected to state explicitly and point by point why they are opposed to it, how it differs from actual history and why the current curriculum should remain in place and not stand alongside this.

I’m of the firm belief most of the people opposed haven’t read it, either in full or even partially and have no fact-based argument why they’re against it.