Photo: iStock

In his everyday life, Stephen Arnquist was a typical high school teacher. Since 2018, he has worked at Skyline High School in Dallas, Texas, whose student body is 99 percent non-white. Like many white men, he enjoyed activities such as balancing his sunglasses on the bill of his baseball cap, standing for the national anthem, wondering about Chicago and boasting about his Caucasian heritage.

But Stephen Arnquist is also allegedly a white supremacist.

To most people, Arnquist’s public persona came across like a store-brand white man. But online, it was as if the 33-year-old Japanese teacher had transformed himself from Dollar Tree Clark Kent into a super racist. Luckily, the instructor’s internet antics had been carefully concealed until an online group exposed Arnquist’s alleged white supremacist identity with the one element that could piece his cyber-Nazi armor:

Google.

On Tuesday, Eugene Antifa, an anti-fascist group dedicated to outing white supremacists, published information connecting Arnquist to multiple hate groups and neo-Nazi websites, including Identity Evropa, Stormfront and American Renaissance. However, the post did not indicate if Arnquist was tied to the granddaddy of all extremist sites—Facebook.

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After taking a DNA test to prove he was 99.9 percent white (the remaining was “unassigned” but I’m guessing he’s .1 percent devil), Arnquist posted his 23&Me results to the Discord message board. According to screenshots from the Nazi site Stormfront, in January 2015, Arnquist also asked his fellow white nationalists this question:

I currently live in Japan teaching English. I like living here, but learning more about race has awakened a deep feeling of kinship and a desire to return to live among my own people. Asians are fine people, but living here is so bland, conversations with Japanese people are so bland. I’m afraid if I stay here too much longer I’ll be stuck here for the rest of my life. Any recommendations to where I could go? I’d love to teach Japanese to whites instead of English to Japanese, they are notoriously bad as English.

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Arnquist eventually moved back to America, where he found a job as a self-described “high school Japanese teacher in the ghetto.” Among his other beliefs, Arnquist reportedly said that the “Democratic Party is no party for white men,” and suggests that white advocates join the Republican Party because it’s “where most of our people are, anyway.”

WFAA reports that the Dallas Independent School District has placed Arnquist on administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation. A spokesperson also told the station that the school district is trying to verify the authenticity of the social media posts.

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The New York Times has not announced when it will publish a glowing 3,000-word profile, “The Klansman around the KKKorner” about how Stephen Arnquist is just a regular guy who goes bowling, enjoys Dallas Cowboys football and sometimes—mostly on evenings and weekends—fantasizes about a mass genocide that would rid the world of Jews, black people and anyone who wears Asics with Khakis and a polo.