Image: Lynne Patton, event planner and Head of Region II for HUD, looks on as New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and Ben Carson, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), take questions after signing a ceremonial agreement. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Congressional gollywog and Department of Housing and Urban Development official Lynne Patton, whose wig and shades briefly became the center of Cohen’s Congressional Snitchin’ Circus, may have had ulterior motives for stepping up to play the role of Rep. Mark Meadows’ black shield.

According to the Washington Post, she may have been trying to hustle up a reality show.

Michael Cohen’s hearing before Congress took a turn for the tired after Democratic congresswoman Rashida Tlaib (rightly) pointed out the GOP’s naked attempt to push back against claims of Trump’s racism with Patton’s presence.

“She,” Meadows said, referring to Patton, a longtime Trump supporter, “says that as a daughter of a man born in Birmingham, Alabama, that there is no way that she would work for an individual who was a racist.”

“Just because someone has a black person working for them does not mean they aren’t racist,” Tliab said. Meadows, seated in front of Patton, defended her presence, claiming Tliab was racist to suggest he would use Patton as a “prop.”

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Last year, according to the Post, Patton tried to land permission to star in a TV series from the producers of reality TV’s bronze medal, The Real Housewives of Potomac, while working for HUD. Patton was seeking to join a cast of other black Republicans according to a memo from October of last year.

HUD has yet to release the memo to the public.

“Black Republicans are not an anomaly,” Patton said. “Not only do we suffer the same hurdles that face any black man or black woman every single day, we also have the additional albatross of being conservative,” she added, describing a personal problem nobody asked the Allen Westses of the world to take on. Patton’s memo also requested permission to record dinners with Ben Carson, Trump family members and other high-ranking White House officials.

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Since HUD’s denial of Patton’s request to appear on the show featuring herself and a group of “powerful black women,” she’s made herself more visible to media, the Post reported. She moved into New York public housing to highlight the substandard living conditions before cutting her stint short for Mandatory meetings in D.C. On the last day, she skipped out, opting for the warmth of a racist southern son.

Patton took to Facebook to lament her feelings of betrayal after the details of her 2018 memo were published by the Post. “This is not about money,” Patton said in her post. “I could make 10 times the amount writing a book about a fraction of what I know. This is about me honoring my commitment to the American people. If producers are truly interested, they’ll figure out a way to make it work without me having to compromise my own principled mission.”

While HUD may not be ready to step into 2019’s reality show landscape, Patton’s Dream Girls wig is ready to star on the hottest reality vehicle of 2009.