Photo: John D. Simmons (AP Images)

Former Carolina Panther wide receiver Rae Carruth is not a redeemable soul, and thankfully he’s starting to realize this, and won’t try to have a relationship with his 18-year-old son who suffers from cerebral palsy as a result of Carruth’s criminal actions.

Let me be clear about this: I don’t hate many people; in fact, my hate list looks a little something like this:

  1. Anyone who voted for or supports President Donald Trump.
  2. Rae Carruth.
  3. People who don’t know their order when they walk into McDonald’s. Seriously, how many times have you eaten at McDonald’s and you still don’t know what you want to eat?

That’s it. That’s my list. All of those people deserve the hate, but Rae Carruth might be the worst.

The long and short of it is this: In 1999 Carruth got his then-lady friend Cherica Adams pregnant. Carruth wanted Adams to have an abortion and she refused, so Carruth paid men to kill her.

Adams survived long enough to tell police that Carruth had set her up. Adams’ unborn son would survive but was born with cerebral palsy. Carruth was sentenced to 18-24 years in prison, and Adams’ mother, Saundra Adams, has raised her grandson, Chancellor Lee Adams, from birth until now. He’s 18. He’s doing fine. He knows he has a dad. He doesn’t need to meet him.

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Carruth is up to be released in October, and I recently wrote a bipartisan piece on Carruth’s request to be part of his son’s life. You can read it below:

Thankfully, because God is still guiding the way, no matter how much hatred the Trump administration spouts, Carruth now knows that staying out of his son’s life is the best move. Last month, Carruth wrote a 16-page self-serving apology that he sent to a television station, claiming that his son’s grandmother had been spreading false stories about him. It was a stark contrast from the four-page, 800-word letter he recently sent to the Charlotte Observer noting that he recognizes that not being around would be in “everyone’s best interest.”

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“For all involved or invested in this ordeal, please calm down,” Carruth wrote to Observer reporter Scott Fowler. “I will no longer be pursuing a relationship with Chancellor and Ms. Adams. I promise to leave them be, which I now see is in everyone’s best interest.”

Tiffany Shears-Trice, a spokesperson for the Carruth family, who holds the ex-NFL player’s power of attorney, told the newspaper that the former wide receiver is “just trying to do the right thing here with the Adams family and not disrupt anyone’s lives.”

“Rae can see Chancellor is a happy, healthy soul and he doesn’t want to interfere with that,” Shears-Trice said. “But he will still live up to his financial responsibilities for his son—he definitely wants to do that and he will do that. He wants to help.”

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The New York Post notes that “Saundra Adams was awarded nearly $5.8 million in damages in a wrongful death lawsuit in 2003, but she said she’s received hardly any money from that judgment since the four men convicted in the plot have been imprisoned or unemployed since that time.”

During his stay in prison, Carruth become a barber and was earning roughly a dollar per day. A long way from his NFL days, when, the Post reports, Carruth was cashing game checks totaling nearly $40,000.

Carruth apologized for “having the audacity to believe that there was ever a real place” for him in Chancellor’s life aside from afar.

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“He may have called me ‘Rae,’ but I was really looking forward to giving him a dad,” Carruth wrote.

Man, fuck this guy. Here’s to hoping that he gets a windfall of cash that he immediately has to turn over to his son and Saundra Adams, and then continues cutting only the strongest, most unruly hair and making only $1 a day for the rest of his life.