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The Conways are back to (M)ake (A)crimony (G)reat (A)gain.

Thursday night saw Republican Twitter renegade George Conway hit his own wife with the Dikembe finger via Twitter, after Kellyanne stopped by CNN to defend her kumquat-tinted boss to Chris Cuomo against the claims made by former kumquat counsel Michael Cohen.

“You just like to say ‘the president lies’ so it goes viral,” snapped Conway, who reiterated Trump’s defense. “Sometimes you’re trying to get rid of a nuisance,” she said. “Sometimes you’re trying to save your family from embarrassment.”

Family? Embarrassment? Kellyanne wasn’t ready.

George wasn’t having any of it, as he would soon reveal to his Twitter followers.

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“Given that Trump has repeatedly lied about the Daniels and McDougal payments—and given that he lies about virtually everything else, to the point that his own former personal lawyer described him as a “f[uck]ing liar”—why should we take his word over that of federal prosecutors?”

Not content with merely flaming his wife in less than 280 characters, Conway published an article for the Washington Post calling Trump’s defense “weak,” outlined the case against him vis a vis the one brought against former senator John Edwards while directly refuting claims made by his wife. In it, the longtime lawyer explained that Edwards’ case (emphasis added):

provides a precedent that other courts could follow in any prosecution arising out of the hush-money schemes Trump paid: The president could face criminal charges for conspiring with Cohen to make the payments because the evidence shows the payments were made, at least in part, for campaign purposes. As for what the jury concluded in the Edwards case, there’s good reason to believe that the evidence in a criminal case against Trump would be much stronger.

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While the Conway petty has long been a source of comedy for media insiders and those of us who live for drama alike, a bit of scorekeeping is in order. While George’s latest screed may seem petty, Kellyanne, in a Washington Post profile, described her husband’s tweets about her as “a violation of decency, certainly, if not marital vows.” As if that wasn’t petty enough, take a look at the exchange in full:

Me: You told me you found [George’s tweets] disrespectful.

Kellyanne: It is disrespectful, it’s a violation of basic decency, certainly, if not marital vows . . . as “a person familiar with their relationship.”

Me: No, we’re on the record here. You can’t say after the fact “as someone familiar.”

Kellyanne: I told you everything about his tweets was off the record.

Me: No, that’s not true. That never happened.

Kellyanne: Well, people do see it this way. People do see it that way, I don’t say I do, but people see it that way.

Me: But I’m saying we never discussed everything about his tweets being off the record. There are certain things you said that I put off the record.

Kellyanne: Fine. I’ve never actually said what I think about it and I won’t say what I think about it, which tells you what I think about it. 

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The family that shades together, stays together.