Minnesota Police Orgs Suggest Some Cops May Not Do Their Jobs During Derek Chauvin Trial Due to ‘Demonization’ of Police

A person holds a sign of George Floyd during a demonstration on August 17, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Community members came together for a rally to protest the city’s potential forceful reopening 38th Street and Chicago Ave, an unofficial autonomous zone known as George Floyd Square.
A person holds a sign of George Floyd during a demonstration on August 17, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Community members came together for a rally to protest the city’s potential forceful reopening 38th Street and Chicago Ave, an unofficial autonomous zone known as George Floyd Square.
Photo: Brandon Bell (Getty Images)

Here’s a question: Are police officers born representing the epitome of snowflake-dom or is it a character trait that comes with the job?

I ask this because for generations, cops have enjoyed having a certain image—one that casts them as heroes and brave warriors sworn to protect and serve. They were the only thing standing between civilians and a nation overrun with lawlessness and chaos, and for that, they were to be exalted as courageous guardians of law and order—and their toughness was never to be questioned.

Then the Black Lives Matter movement came along and ruined everything. There was a time, even after the civil rights movement of the ’50s and ’60s, when activists blustering about systemic racism in policing was something America could easily dismiss as anti-cop fear-mongering or simply ignore altogether. Then, George Floyd was killed and a wave of nationwide protests brought about a racial awakening in America, and it resulted in the massive egos of cops across the nation being morphed into whiney little baby blue tears.

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Derek Chauvin’s trial will begin in March. According to Newsweek, Minnesota state officials are preparing for protests and civil unrest that may occur during the court proceedings.

From Newsweek:

Colonel Matt Langer, head of the Minnesota State Patrol, said he intended to call in troopers from around the state during the trial and verdict, according to Minnesota Public Radio News. He reportedly added that local units who send backups wanted guarantees that they’ll be easily reimbursed for overtime, lodging and other costs.

Governor Tim Walz has put forward proposals for State Aid for Emergencies in his budget, while the Minnesota House’s Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Committee voted along Democrat party lines to advance a new $35 million fund to reimburse law enforcement agencies.

The proposal’s fate in the Republican-controlled State Senate remains unclear, however, as some GOP lawmakers have argued that it would take money away from most of the state in order to bail out Minneapolis.

The heads of the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association, Minnesota Sheriffs’ Association and Minnesota Chief of Police Association—who together represent about 10,800 law enforcement personnel—said some agencies might not respond to calls for extra help during Chauvin’s trial, “no matter what legislation is passed.”

So why are these law enforcement agencies feeling so blue (pun intended) despite so many officials looking to do the exact opposite of what the “defund the police” movement demands? Well, on Tuesday, three pro-cop associations released a wordy statement that I’ve taken the liberty to summarize in a single quote (that I made up): “I just...I just feel...like...nobody likes me anymore. *sniffles*”

OK, whatever, here’s what the actual statement says as reported by Newsweek:

“We thank Governor Tim Walz for including the State Aid for Emergencies (SAFE) initiative in his budget proposal and highlighting its importance to the public safety community. We support the Governor’s bill language as introduced and we are grateful for the open conversations about this issue over the past month.

“Our members remain concerned, however, that no matter what legislation is passed, the response for mutual aid will not be as robust as the public may expect.

“Our members’ concern is due to the continued demonization of law enforcement officers by certain public officials at various levels of government.”

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Government officials never demonize cops. The entire world watched Chauvin kneel on Floyd’s neck until he died and the subsequent outrage was and is something officials have to respond to. The fact that not every official is responding with the traditional cop-friendly narratives—that police officers have a hard job that demands absolute submission to their authority and that speaking against them is simply un-American—isn’t an example of demonization, it just means an era of unconditional and unquestioned support for police has (somewhat) ended. But make no mistake: The justice system still bleeds blue and still has the collective back of America’s police.

Then again, if cops are refusing to do their jobs in response to calls for police accountability—like the Minneapolis police officers who resigned over the summer because protesters hurt their fragile blue feelings—maybe they need to be demonized.

Zack Linly is a poet, performer, freelance writer, blogger and grown man lover of cartoons

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DISCUSSION

murrychang
Murry Chang

People are saying you’re bad at your job so you’re gonna stick it to ‘em by...being bad at your job?

That’s cop logic for you.