Colin Kaepernick, foreground (Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

Unsigned NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick is preparing to file a grievance against NFL owners for collusion and has hired high-profile attorney Mark Geragos, according to reports.

Bleacher Report’s Mike Freeman first tweeted news of the grievance Sunday afternoon, adding that Kaepernick will be releasing a statement.

 

 

According to Sports Illustrated, “Collusion occurs when two or more teams, or the league and at least one team, join to deprive a player of a contractually earned right. Such a right is normally found in the collective bargaining agreement signed by a league and its players’ association. For example, the right of a free-agent player to negotiate a contract with a team cannot be impaired by a conspiracy of teams to deny that player a chance to sign.”

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During the 2016 NFL season, Kaepernick was the first NFL player to kneel during the national anthem as a protest against racial injustice and police brutality in America.

Kaepernick opted out of his contract at the end of last season, and many assumed that he would be signed by one of the 32 NFL teams, especially given that he posted above-average numbers on a less-than-stellar San Francisco team. (He finished the year with 16 touchdowns and only four interceptions in 12 games.)

When that didn’t happen, and far less talented quarterbacks were signed to start or even serve as backups this season, many believed that the NFL owners had blackballed the 29-year-old for his actions.

Several NFL players have continued to kneel this season—not only in support of Kaepernick but also to continue to bring light to the reason he began his protest in the first place: racial injustice in America, much to the dismay of some fans and President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly spoken out about the players’ actions.

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Others, however, including Howard University’s cheerleaders, a German soccer team and the cast of Miss Saigon, have all knelt in solidarity with him.

Read more at Bleacher Report and Sports Illustrated.