Lubaina Himid (@UCLan via Twitter)

Lubaina Himid is a visual artist whose drawings, paintings and installations reflect the African Diaspora, and on Tuesday she became the first nonwhite woman to win the prestigious Turner Prize, a British contemporary-art award.

According to the New York Times, this year’s award was the first since 1991 to be open to artists over the age of 50—and at 63, Himid has also become the oldest recipient in the award’s history. She will receive a cash prize of 25,000 pounds, or about $34,000.

Advertisement

In a statement, Alex Farquharson—Tate Britain’s director and chairman of the Turner Prize jury—said the jury “praised the artist for her uncompromising tackling of issues including colonial history and how racism persists today.”

Himid was born in Tanzania. Her win was announced by British electronic artist and musician Goldie at a ceremony in Hull, England, that was broadcast by the BBC.

Himid has a selection of work on display in the Turner Prize exhibition. Included is a collection of English ceramics painted with images of black slaves.

Advertisement

Established in 1984, the Turner Prize is a visual-arts award given to an artist born, living or working in Britain. Each year, four artists are shortlisted, and the prize goes to an outstanding exhibition or other presentation in the preceding year.

Read more at the New York Times.