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A Georgia teacher sent students and faculty into panic after he fired at least one shot inside a classroom, spiking tensions even further after the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the incident occurred at Dalton (Ga.) High School, some 91 miles northwest of Atlanta.

The incident unfolded around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday after some students attempted to get into Randal Davidson’s classroom, but he refused to let them in, Dalton police spokesperson Bruce Frazier confirmed.

The students told the principal, who then came to the door and started to use his key to open it; however, Davidson forced the door closed on the principal. It was at that point that the principal heard a gunshot, sending terrified students scattering.


“We had officers inside the building quickly,” Frazier said.

Officers evacuated a hallway and secured the area. One student was hurt during the evacuation and had to be treated for an ankle injury.

Some 30-45 minutes after the shot went off, law enforcement got Davidson to surrender, and he was taken into custody.


“I don’t believe we’ve had any dealings with him before,” Frazier said.

Davidson was well-known as the longtime radio voice of Dalton High School football and basketball. The 53-year-old, who also teaches social studies, has been with Dalton High since 2004.

Following the incident, students were relocated to the Northwest Georgia Trade and Convention Center, where parents and guardians were asked to pick them up.


The terrifying incident at Dalton occurs some two weeks after 17 students and school employees were gunned down inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. That shooting has led to discussion about possibly arming teachers in the event of an active shooter situation, an idea endorsed by President Donald Trump.

Along those lines, the Florida House Appropriations Committee just recently approved training teachers to carry guns in class under the direction of local law enforcement, if school superintendents or school boards approve. The state’s Senate Appropriations Committee gave the nod to a similar bill later the same day.


But what if that armed teacher was, in fact, the aggressor instead of the savior?

The situation in Georgia could have ended a lot differently. Are we going to wait to see how badly it can turn out before we stop bringing more guns on campuses?