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A New York City woman has filed a lawsuit against a city cop she says sent her a string of inappropriate, lewd messages after arresting her.

“I was shocked and confused,” the plaintiff, Kammie Sifonte, told the New York Post.

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In one of the alleged disgusting texts, Police Officer Rony Santiago is accused of sending a photo of himself along with the message “love a woman who could sit on my face.”

Another quipped, “I think u look better with the cuffs on.”

Sifonte, 22, said that her issues with Santiago began Nov. 21, 2016, after he arrested her for allegedly shoplifting at a Target.

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Sifonte was taken back to the 52nd Precinct. And, she says, about 20 minutes after releasing her on a desk-appearance ticket, Santiago started texting her, telling her that he wanted to be part of a “threesome orgy” and that she was “thick in all the right places,” the lawsuit, filed Monday, claims.

Santiago, the suit claims, told Sifonte that he regularly flirts with attractive women he arrests.

Sifonte said that she did not give the officer her number, which she said he had clearly taken from her paperwork. She also found it alarming that Santiago now knew her home address and had even threatened to show up there for dinner in one message, according to the Post.

Sifonte said that she went along with the crude texts out of fear that Santiago could control the outcome of her criminal case. She acknowledged that she even sent him a picture of herself, worried that if she rejected him, he would testify at her trial and maybe even lie.

Ultimately, Sifonte’s criminal case was dismissed and sealed, according to civil lawyer Henry Bell.

The lewd texts came to a sudden stop Nov. 23.

Sifonte is now suing Santiago, the Police Department and the city for “in excess of $25,000” for the “extreme and outrageous conduct” that she claims violated her civil rights and also caused her emotional distress.

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“It hurts everybody in the community when a police officer does something like this,” Bell said. “It erodes trust in the community, and that trust is essential.”

Read more at the New York Post.