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It’s been two days, just two days, since President Donald Trump took office, and the weird news just keeps coming. On Tuesday, Sean “Spicy Facts” Spicer made it clear that real facts, aka the truth, will not be in play at this White House when he walked out to the podium and continued the myth that millions of illegal votes were cast for Hillary Clinton.

“The president does believe that, I think he’s stated that before, and stated his concern of voter fraud and people voting illegally during the campaign, and continues to maintain that belief based on studies and evidence people have brought to him,” Spicer said, CNN reports.

When pressed about evidence, Spicy Facts provided none, noting only that Trump “has believed that for a while based on studies and information he has.”

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When asked whether the White House will investigate the claim, Spicy Facts replied, “Maybe we will.”

Umm, so let me get this straight: Actual investigated evidence shows that Russia had a hand in screwing with the presidential election. Several of the U.S. investigative agencies have confirmed this, but the president and his staff act as if this is nothing. Then Trump loses the popular vote by a landslide, and because his fragile ego can’t handle it, he creates an unproved and widely debunked claim that millions voted illegally, and Spicy Facts is going to push this dope, but the White House isn’t going to demand an investigation?

Since losing the popular vote to Clinton, Trump has continually claimed that millions of undocumented immigrants voted for her, which, according to him, is the only way he could’ve lost. According to CNN, Trump repeated the claim again during a White House dinner Monday.

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Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes in November, and several studies have found that there is no evidence of voter fraud.

From “The Truth About Voter Fraud,” a report written by experts at the Brennan Center for Justice, according to CNN: “Given this tiny incident rate for voter-impersonation fraud, it is more likely [...] that an American will be struck by lightning than that he will impersonate another voter at the polls.”