New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., lying in a hospital bed after having been stabbed in a Harlem, N.Y., department store in 1958.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King at the airport with his wife, Coretta, and children, Yolanda and Martin III, after being freed from prison, Oct. 27, 1960, in Chamblee, Ga.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Here, King is shown in 1960 pulling up a cross that was burned on the lawn of his home in Atlanta as his son stands next to him.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Freedom Riders Ralph Abernathy and John Lewis sit with King during a press conference for the Freedom Rides on May 23, 1961.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King is arrested after an anti-segregation march in Birmingham, Ala., April 12, 1963.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Civil rights leaders including John Lewis, Whitney Young Jr., King, James Farmer and Roy Wilkins stand behind a table during a meeting at the Hotel Commodore in New York in 1963.

U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X wait for a press conference on March 26, 1964.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Coretta Scott King plays the piano for her 1-year-old daughter, Bernice Alberteen, in the King home in Atlanta in 1964. Mrs. King gave up a concert career to wed her husband.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King seated at a table and the Rev. Ralph Abernathy standing in St. John's County Jail, St. Augustine, Fla., on June 12, 1964. The two were arrested on trespassing charges during a sit-in attempt at a motel restaurant.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King addresses CORE demonstrators protesting the seating of the Mississippi delegation during the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, N.J, Aug. 24, 1964.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King arriving at the FBI on Dec. 1, 1964, to meet with FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover after Hoover called King "the most notorious liar in the country." King said he asked for the meeting to end the controversy.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

The King family surrounded by reporters at the Atlanta airport on their way to Oslo, Norway, in 1964.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King lying in bed in Oslo reading the novel The Prize by Irving Wallace. King was presented with the Nobel Peace Prize on Dec. 10, 1964.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Yolanda King stands on tiptoe as she tries to have a word with her parents during a testimonial dinner in her father's honor on Jan. 27, 1965.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King and entertainer Sammy Davis Jr. share a laugh in Davis' dressing room at New York's Majestic Theater in 1965.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

President Lyndon B. Johnson gives King one of the pens used in the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, legislation that outlawed discriminatory voting practices such as literacy tests and poll taxes.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Watts neighborhood residents listen to King after the riots of 1965 in Los Angeles that killed 34 people.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Rabbi Abraham Heschel presents the Judaism and World Peace award to King on Dec. 7, 1965.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

King greets a group of young people during a stop in Cleveland on April 26, 1967. He cautioned the youths against street disorder and also publicly endorsed Robert Kennedy and Charles Percy as the two best presidential candidates, from a "civil rights standpoint."