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". . . Governor Deval Patrick, speaking Tuesday night at the Democratic National Convention, assailed his predecessor’s economic record, pointing to anemic job growth and deep budget cuts that affected education, transportation, and other programs that support the state’s economy," Megan Woolhouse and Michael Rezendes reported Wednesday for the Boston Globe. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's campaign "responded that the former governor turned a wide budget deficit into a surplus, held the line on taxes, and left office with fewer unemployed in Massachusetts than today."

Who's right?

In another example of news organizations responding quickly to varying assertions of the truth, the Globe answered the question quickly online and in the morning paper:

"And like Obama, Romney struggled mightily, delivering at best a modest recovery dictated less by his political leadership than by sprawling global forces beyond his control.

"Like Obama, Romney could also point to an economy that was much improved from the worst of the recession. But, as with the US economy today, progress was slow, painstaking, and for many, disappointing.

"At the end of his term, Romney could claim a small net job gain and a lower unemployment rate, but the pace of job growth lagged the nation badly and only a huge outflow of Massachusetts workers to faster growing states kept the unemployment rate from climbing higher.

"It is not quite the image of a turnaround painted by Romney's presidential campaign.

". . . But Romney's handling of the Massachusetts' economy was more complicated than the unemployment rate or state's credit rating would indicate. His budgetary and economic decisions offer insight into his personal and political priorities. There were unexpected foes, victories, and lost opportunities. . . ."

"At 22,087 TPM, the end of Clinton's 50-minute-long address Wednesday beat Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's peak last week in Tampa, but was lower than First Lady Michelle Obama's Tuesday night, according to Twitter's official blog," Li reported.

To mark the first time a former president has nominated an incumbent one, the Washington Post deployed David Maraniss, author of biographies of both men, to write a stage-setter that was published on Monday.

". . . The relationship between Clinton and Obama has evolved in stages," Maraniss wrote. "The earliest step toward reconciliation might be the most telling: when Obama, as president-elect, asked Hillary Clinton to serve as secretary of state. She needed persuading, and in this case Obama and Bill Clinton were co-conspirators, both pushing the idea that she should take the job. If there were political calculations involved on either side, the simple fact that Hillary Clinton joined the Obama administration changed the dynamics; that she proved to be indefatigable and adept as Madam Secretary at once heartened her husband and deepened the appreciation of the president.

"After two years during which they rarely spoke, the first public sign that Bill and Barack were teaming up on domestic policy issues came shortly after the 2010 midterm elections that proved disastrous for the Democrats, who lost control of the House and barely kept the Senate. Obama found himself making deals with House Republicans even before they took over, agreeing to some tax cuts in exchange for an extension of unemployment insurance.

"On the afternoon of Dec. 11, Clinton visited the Oval Office, where he and Obama spent a long session discussing the policy and politics of the situation and how to explain the president's position. It was, Obama said later, a 'terrific conversation' -- so stimulating that he thought 'it might be useful' for Clinton to share his thoughts with the media and the public. Obama and Clinton seemed like tourists from Des Moines as they scrambled to find out how to open the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the White House and then round up enough reporters and cameras to make it worthwhile.

"When the scene was finally ready, Obama entered with Clinton at his side. With a smile, he called Clinton 'the other guy,' as in 'I thought I'd bring the other guy in.' The word 'guy' made it a term of affection and respect, marking a change from an earlier time when Obama would more often regard Clinton as simply 'the other' -- an unpredictable and occasionally hostile alien force. . . . "

Charles D. Ellison, Uptown: Does Barack Really Need Bubba? (Sept. 6)

Lori Robertson with Eugene Kiely, Brooks Jackson and Robert Farley, factcheck.org: Our Clinton Nightmare (Sept. 6)

On Monday, Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan told a campaign rally audience in North Carolina that "the president can say a lot of things, but he can't tell you you are better off," the staff of NPR's "Fresh Air" said on Wednesday. "Later that day in Detroit, Vice President Joe Biden responded 'America is better off today than they left us.' "

David Leonhardt, the New York Times Washington bureau chief who won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary last year for his columns on economics, was asked about those comments on "Fresh Air" Wednesday. He said that both Ryan and Biden are right: It's partly semantics.

"The country itself is better off," Leonhardt told host Terry Gross. The economy has stabilized since the recession in 2008, which was "a little bit worse than 1929. And yet, of course, we don't have anything that looks like the Great Depression. As bad as the economy is, we don't have unemployment at 20 percent."

But, Leonhardt said, when looking at measures such as household income and median wealth, "a typical American household is worse off than it was four years ago."

Financial crises inflict their damage "over many months and then there are long, slow, disappointing recoveries," he said.

"Ultimately, it is difficult to evaluate Ryan's and Biden's assertions, Leonhardt said, because the Republicans might have acted differently from the Democrats in the wake of the recession," the show summarized.

Michael Cottman, blackamericaweb.com: Will You Be Better Off?

Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune: The Obama years: Better off today? Don't ask

Dennis D. Parker and Larry Schwartztol, HuffPost BlackVoices: The Economic Crisis Isn't Colorblind

The Hartford Courant late last week stopped using Google Translate to translate its pages into Spanish, and instead has developed Noticias, "a 100-percent Spanish language news site produced by our newsroom," Gary Weitman, spokesman for the parent Tribune Co., told Journal-isms on Wednesday.

The Courant had started using free software developed by Google to translate its stories into Spanish.

In July, former Courant columnist Bessy Reyna compiled some of the gaffes that resulted.

"It's hard to imagine that the Courant, the oldest continuously-published newspaper in the country, would think so little of its readers as to publish a poorly worded computer generated translation, without anyone verifying that the versions are grammatically correct," Reyna wrote. "Or does the paper think that Latinos are going to be ever so grateful to have to guess the meaning of the news in Spanish?"

The National Association of Hispanic Journalists added its voice last month, and offered to help the Courant better reach Spanish-speaking readers.

As Andrew Beaujon first reported Wednesday for the Poynter Institute, Weitman said, "The Courant has also hired a part-time local editor, Marysol Saldana-Knipper, who will assist in translating Courant-produced stories into Spanish. The Courant also recently launched Mi Comunidad, produced by Courant Photojournalist Patrick Raycraft, it's a multimedia news package highlighting stories from our growing Latino community. Patrick is fluent in Spanish and his stories will be appear regularly on Noticias."

Weitman added for Journal-isms by email, "In addition to locally produced content, Noticias will also feature Spanish written national and international stories that will primarily come from news feeds provided by Tribune papers in Florida and Chicago. Our new video partner, NDN, also offers a Spanish language video service we're using as well."

Weitman said, "This was a local decision made in Hartford."

In an email message written in lower case, NAHJ President Hugo Balta told Journal-isms, "i am encouraged by the changes the hartford courant has implemented. it's a positive step in the right direction in not only producing content that meets the journalistic standards of the newspaper, but also reflects the needs of the latino community. i look forward to further positive progress."

[Reyna messaged on Thursday, "I think they finally did the right thing. I am sure they would not have gotten the message without Poynter's and NAHJ's involvement in supporting my blog. I am very happy they will provide this service to the Latino community in the professional manner it should have had from the beginning. . (and, by the way, Courant never contacted me about the change, even though I had spoken with the person in charge of the Espanol web.)"]

Last October, Cary Clack left his hometown paper, the San Antonio Express-News, where he had been a columnist for 17 years, to become communications director and senior adviser for Texas State Rep. Joaquin Castro's congressional campaign.

This week, Clack is at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., where Joaquin and his twin brother, Mayor Julian Castro of San Antonio, created buzz Tuesday as Julian became the first Latino  to deliver a DNC keynote.

"Things are going great," Clack told Journal-isms Wednesday by email. "When I left the paper, it was a gamble because Joaquin was in a tough primary fight and if he'd lost I would have been without a job.

"Now, he's the prohibitive favorite (and has been since December) and Julian delivering the keynote and Joaquin introducing him was something that was thought about a year ago. It was surreal to be on the floor last night and see both of them on stage and on the big screen. I've never regretted leaving the Express-News. I owe so much to them -- they made my career -- but I've never regretted leaving. I'm touched immensely that three days don't go by without someone saying or writing how much they miss me. I wasn't expected to be missed this long but it was time.

"But I must say that this is the first big event I've been to which I wasn't covering and, instinctively, I find myself framing columns and stories in my head. But I'm proud to be associated with one of the big stories this week: the stepping onto the national stage of Julian and Joaquin Castro. They are as good and real as they appear."

John W. Gonzalez and Richard Dunham, San Antonio Express-News: After keynote, Julian Castro's political future still unwritten (Sept. 6)

Julio (Julito) Ricardo Varela, latinorebels.com: My Six Big Picture Thoughts About Julián Castro and His Keynote Speech

An independent journalist wrote Wednesday that authorities threw him out of the media section at the Democratic National Convention after he asked presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett, who had just concluded a television interview, about the Obama administration's use of drone strikes. Jarrett told him to schedule an interview.

Michael Tracey, who writes for salon.com and the American Conservative, told Journal-isms by telephone, "My assumption was that her staff and the event staff were working in concert" when he was thrown out.

However, Clo Ewing, director of constituency press, who was present during the incident, told Journal-isms by telephone that calling the authorities "was not something I asked to happen." Nor did Jarrett, Ewing said, adding that she was still trying to determine what had taken place.

Tracey posted his account on theamericanconservative.com. Salon spokesman Liam O'Donoghue told Journal-isms by email, "I've been informed that Mike Tracey is not attending the DNC as a representative or correspondent for Salon."

"As I sat up in the rafters listening to some Democratic National Convention speech -- I don't even particularly remember which one -- Jarrett suddenly appeared to my right. She was being interviewed on camera by some television hack; I don't even particularly know whom. So I rose from my seat and observed. There was an unnerving coldness about Jarrett's demeanor -- naturally, she laughed and smiled for the camera, bantering obligingly. But callousness underlain this guise of mainstream jocular propriety. I could see it in her eyes. . . ."

Jack Mirkinson of the Huffington Post cited the Tracey incident Wednesday under the headline, "Journalists Confronted By Police, Undercover Agents While Covering The DNC."

". . . In a post on Tuesday night, Kevin Gosztola, a journalist for the Firedoglake blog, wrote about the police intimidation that he and fellow journalist Steve Horn had encountered during one of several protests that have been carried out by undocumented immigrants over the course of the convention," Mirkinson wrote.

Jo Becker, New York Times: The Other Power in the West Wing

Eric Deggans, Tampa Bay (Fla.) Times: What we media types learned at the RNC

Jon Friedman, MarketWatch: How Obama can win back the media

Dana Milbank, Washington Post: A media lovefest in Charlotte

What emerged from focus group data, Rove told the donors, "is an 'acute Sheelah Kolhatkarunderstanding of the nature of those undecided, persuadable' voters. 'If you say he's a socialist, they'll go to defend him. If you call him a "far out left-winger," they’ll say, "no, no, he's not." ' The proper strategy, Rove declared, was criticizing Obama without really criticizing him -- by reminding voters of what the president said that he was going to do and comparing it to what he's actually done. 'If you keep it focused on the facts and adopt a respectful tone, then they're gonna agree with you.'

" . . . Rove spoke almost exclusively about defeating Barack Obama and retaking control of the White House. There was sparse praise for Mitt Romney -- either as a candidate or as a future leader and policy maker."

Michael Calderone wrote for the Huffington Post, "Kolhatkar's piece about the Rove breakfast -- published the following day by a business magazine rather than any of the myriad non-stop news sites and broadcast outlets -- stood out amid reams of convention reporting, punditry, and Clint Eastwood-related tweets. It was an out-and-out scoop, an important window into Rove's role as the Republican Party's Daddy Warbucks, and the only piece Kolhatkar wrote before flying back to New York the next day. "

" 'I think it's an important reminder of what's really driving this entire election," Kolhatkar said. 'It gave us a real look at how these guys talk and how they see this whole thing, which is almost a big game they're very determined to win.' "

'MSNBC president Phil Griffin is a happy man," Michael Calderone wrote Tuesday for the Huffington Post.

"On Wednesday afternoon, Griffin learned that MSNBC was the top-rated cable network for the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, a first in its 16-year history and a validation of the network's progressive shift in recent years.

"Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan aggressively defended himself Tuesday against allegations that his GOP convention speech last week stretched the truth, saying that opponents and fact-checkers accusing him of false or misleading statements should 'read the speech,' " Jerry Markon and Felicia Sonmez wrote Wednesday in the Washington Post.

"Democrats are seizing on Ryan's remarks, seeking to link them to his earlier errors about his personal marathon time and whether his congressional office sought economic stimulus dollars. On the campaign trail this week, Ryan also misstated the number of bankruptcies filed during President Obama's tenure. . . ."

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies: Joint Center Reports on African American Voters and the Republican Party

Ruben Navarrette Jr., syndicated: The GOP's perception problem

Jay Rosen blog: #presspushback

Mark Trahant, Indian Country Today: Elections 2012: Making a Difference in the Polls

"Members of the media immediately praised First Lady Michelle Obama's 2012 Democratic National Convention speech on Tuesday night," Rebecca Shapiro wrote Wednesday for Huffington Post. "Obama, who stunned in a custom Tracy Reese dress, took the stage just after 10:30 p.m. EST.

"Across the cable news networks, pundits swooned over Obama's delivery. There seemed to be some mixed reviews over the strength of the speech itself, but the media seemed to agree that Obama nailed the performance."

Mary C. Curtis, "She the People," Washington Post: At DNC Charlotte, taking the 'war on women' seriously

Glen Ford, blackagendareport.com: What Obama Has Wrought

Emil Guillermo blog, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund: Diversity alive and well at DNC as Michelle Obama, Julian Castro star

Peter Hart, Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting: Newsweek: Obama Needs to Be Clinton

Rick Horowitz, YouTube: Paul Ryan's Problem

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies: Joint Center Reports on African American Voters, Democratic Party

Pew Center for the People & the Press: Biden in a Word: 'Good,' 'Idiot'

Elizabeth Wellington, Philadelphia Inquirer: Michelle Obama's Tracy Reese dress was out of sight.

Joseph P. Williams blog: The Stiletto

"Numbers Never Lie will get a new look on Monday, September 10, when ESPN commentators Jalen Rose and Hugh Douglas join host Michael Smith in fulltime roles," ESPN reported on Wednesday. "The show, which launched in September 2011, offers lively debate and roundtable discussion with quantifiable answers. Numbers Never Lie has one host, two athletes, three opinions, but the analytics will end the debate."

Rashida Rawls, an editor on the Atlanta Journal-Constitution Story Desk, is joining Cox Media Group Ohio as bridge editor, overseeing the story desk and assisting with shared content coordination, both news operations announced separately on Wednesday. Rawls is vice president of the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists and has participated in the Maynard Institute Media Academy at Harvard University.

While the Times-Picayune in New Orleans might be in the middle of its transition to cutting back print publication to just three days a week, Hurricane Isaac gave readers a glimpse of what coverage may look like in the coming months, Christine Haughney reported Sunday for the New York Times. "While The Times-Picayune still printed papers at plants in nearby Mobile, Ala., and Houma, La., the Web site became the destination for residents seeking updates about power failures, closed roads and where to buy ice."

". . . the Advertising Club of New York is undertaking an initiative that supports diversity in the advertising industry," Tanzina Vega reported Monday for the New York Times. "It will be called 'I'mpart' -- the last four letters standing for the goal to promote, attract, retain and train diverse candidates. The initiative is being paid for by a $700,000 investment by the Advertising Club, raised by selling advertising space in print and online that was donated by a variety of publishers. . . ."

"Debbie Denmon, who spent 12 years at WFAA, has accepted a job in the Dallas County District Attorney's Office," Merrill Knox reported Tuesday for TVSpy. "Denmon signed off from the Dallas ABC-affiliate in July after her contract was not renewed. The anchor-reporter filed a lawsuit against WFAA last year, alleging that she was passed over for a promotion because of her weight and race; an arbitrator in the case eventually sided with the station."

"Jackie Robinson, veteran anchor for Syracuse NBC affiliate WSTM, is retiring from the anchor desk after more than three decades at the station," Kevin Eck reported Monday for TVSpy. "Robinson, the first African-American anchor for Syracuse, is slated to give her final broadcast on today's 6:30 p.m. newscast."

". . . Magazines have long had a diversity problem, and that diversity problem is inscribed in their DNA. You can add on to this the fact that the traditional way of breaking into magazines [involves] ways utterly inaccessible to most black people," Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote Tuesday for the Atlantic. "The unpaid internship was long seen as a right of passage. Very few Americans can afford such a luxury, and fewer still African-Americans can afford it." Because of economic pressures, Coates continued, "it becomes really hard to have a conversation about diversity because we are all facing a world in which there is nothing to diversify."

"Sonia Nazario's 'Enrique's Journey,' the nonfiction chronicle of a Honduran teenager's dogged effort to reunite with his mother in the U.S., is the choice for the 2012 One Book, One Denver reading project," Claire Martin reported Tuesday for the Denver Post. "The book is based on the 2002 Pulitzer Prize-winning series Nazario wrote for the Los Angeles Times. The story begins in Honduras when Enrique is 5 years old. His impoverished mother, Lourdes, desperate to feed her children more than one meal a day, decides to find work in the U.S. so she can send money for her children's food and education."

"Terrence Jenkins will join Giuliana Rancic as a permanent anchor of 'E! News,' AJ Marechal reported Tuesday for Variety. "Jenkins' arrival solidifies the program's anchor team after former mainstay Ryan Seacrest stopped regularly hosting this year."

"The website of Qatar-based satellite news network Al Jazeera was apparently hacked on Tuesday by Syrian government loyalists for what they said was the television channel's support for the 'armed terrorist groups and spreading lies and fabricated news,' " Reuters reported on Tuesday.

Journal-isms is published on the site of the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education (www.mije.org). Reprinted on The Root by permission.

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Journal-isms is published on the site of the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education (mije.org). Reprinted on The Root by permission.