2014 Peabody Winners Reflect the Lives and Work of People of Color

The list of winners of the award, which recognizes excellence on radio, TV and the Web, is notable for its diversity.

2014 Peabody winner Henry Louis Gates Jr., journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault and civil rights icon Ruby Bridges speak onstage during The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross With Henry Louis Gates Jr. panel discussion at the Beverly Hilton Hotel Aug. 7, 2013, in Beverly Hills, Calif.
2014 Peabody winner Henry Louis Gates Jr., journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault and civil rights icon Ruby Bridges speak onstage during The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross With Henry Louis Gates Jr. panel discussion at the Beverly Hilton Hotel Aug. 7, 2013, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

People of Color Were Subjects, Creators of Excellence

From the ABC drama “Scandal” to miniseries on the histories of Latinos and of African Americans to close-up looks at urban high schools and NPR’s “The Race Project,” the George Foster Peabody Awards announced Wednesday were enriched by the lives and work of people of color.

“The Peabodys come from the University of Georgia Grady School of Journalism. The honor signifies excellence on television, radio and the Internet,” the school explained. The record 46 winners were announced on “CBS This Morning.”

Eric Deggans, NPR television critic and a first-time Peabody board member, told Journal-isms by email, “I think you’d be hard-pressed to find another major general-interest TV/media award with as much diversity as this Peabody list.”

Charlayne Hunter-Gault, the veteran journalist, three-time Peabody recipient and Peabody board member, joined Ira Glass, host and executive producer of the public radio series “This American Life,” in announcing the honorees on “CBS This Morning.”

Hunter-Gault told Journal-isms by email, “I am so happy to work with a group of people committed to excellence and that they see it in so many works by and about African Americans, among others.”

TVNewsCheck reported, “Issues of race and ethnicity were explored in several impressive recipients: The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Latino Americans, both shown on PBS, traced the history and the ongoing influence of peoples whose presence here predates the forming of the United States. Ken Burns’ The Central Park Five, also on PBS, revisited [an] infamous New York rape case that wrongly sent five black and Latino teenagers to prison. National Public Radio reporter Michelle Norris’ The Race Card Project used six-word summations of listeners’ thoughts about race as the basis of remarkably telling feature reports.”

Among the winners are:

“180 Days: A Year Inside an American High School (PBS)

National Black Programming Consortium, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, PBS

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