Analysis: 20 Percent of Donald Trump’s Supporters Think Slaves Should Not Have Been Freed; 70 Percent Support Confederate Flag

Supporters of the Republican presidential front-runner were also far more likely to express intolerant views than supporters of other GOP candidates.

Supporters cheer while waiting for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to speak at a caucus-night watch party at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino  in Las Vegas on Feb. 23, 2016.
Supporters cheer while waiting for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to speak at a caucus-night watch party at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas on Feb. 23, 2016. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

N.Y. Times Analysis of Surveys Finds Staggering Racial Views

In an election season dominated by racist and xenophobic language on the right, Donald Trump distinguishes himself even among his more outspoken Republican challengers,” Inae Oh reported Wednesday for Mother Jones. “And according to a New York Times analysis of voters, so do his supporters, a majority of whom carry deeply intolerant attitudes toward gay people, Muslims, immigrants, and African Americans.

“In fact, the report found 20 percent of Trump’s base disagree with the freeing of slaves after the Civil War, and a staggering 70 percent would still like to see the Confederate flag flying above official grounds in their states.

“One-third of Trump’s primary supporters in South Carolina favored ‘barring gays and lesbians from entering the country.’ According to the Times, this is more than twice the support this proposal received by Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio backers.

“Another third of his supporters think Japanese internment was an appropriate measure. . . .”

Meanwhile, David Weigel reported Tuesday for the Washington Post, “The flip side of Hillary Clinton’s triumph with black voters in the Nevada Democratic caucuses Saturday was her weakness among whites. For the third time, she lost an electorate that had backed her strongly in 2008. Although Clinton is building toward an expected win in South Carolina this weekend, her vulnerability with white voters could reappear three days later, on Super Tuesday, when the primary contest moves to 11 states, including Minnesota. Even more states come after that with large populations of union members and people who lack college degrees. . . .”

The New York Times issued two caveats in its report on intolerance among Trump supporters.

“New data from YouGov and Public Policy Polling show the extent to which he has tapped into a set of deeply rooted racial attitudes,” Lynn Vavreck wrote Tuesday.

“But first, two caveats about these data are worth bearing in mind. The national YouGov survey was done near the middle of January, before the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries. Public Policy Polling is a company aligned with the Democratic Party, and some of its results over the years have been suspected of bias. Taken by itself, its conclusions could be doubted. Taken with the YouGov and exit poll data, however, these three surveys can give us a better idea of Mr. Trump’s backers. . . .”

Contempt for Media Is Pillar of Sanders’ Worldview

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