A new study shows that affluent blacks and Hispanics live in neighborhoods that are noticeably poorer and have fewer resources than neighborhoods where low-income whites live, the Washington Post reports. The results suggest that income disparities are far from the only explanation for persistent patterns of segregation:

"Income, and being successful in class terms, does not necessarily put you in a different kind of neighborhood," said John Logan, a Brown University sociologist who analyzed census data in his study released Tuesday.

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In almost every measurement, the affluent black and Hispanic households earning more than $75,000 lived in neighborhoods that were in as bad or worse shape than neighborhoods where poor whites and Asians lived.

Poverty rates were about 7 percent in places where well-paid Hispanics and blacks lived — the same as in poor white neighborhoods. Affluent whites and Asians lived in places where it was 5 percent.

Although the study does not take into account amenities such as schools, libraries and grocery stores, the census data suggests that even highly paid minorities live in communities without the same resources available in communities where their white counterparts live.

Read more at the Washington Post.

In other news: Principal With White Supremacist Ties Fired.