Is a New Confederacy Rising?

The Washington Post's Colbert I. King provides historical context to the partial shutdown of the federal government. An "insurgent political force" has captured the Republican Party, he writes.

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Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is interviewed during a Tea Party rally. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

In an insightful piece at the Washington Post, Colbert I. King provides historical context to the partial shutdown of the federal government. An "insurgent political force" has captured the Republican Party "and is taking up where the Old Confederacy left off in its efforts to bring down the federal government," he writes.

It took on new force with fears of the federal government in Washington interfering with their cherished way of life. It gathered steam with the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. And it all came into full flower when shore batteries fired on Fort Sumter. It was the spirit of the Old Confederacy, a state-sponsored rebellion hellbent on protecting its "peace and safety" from the party that took possession of the government on March 4, 1861.

The rebels launched a grisly war against the Union. In his inaugural address, Lincoln warned the Confederacy: "You have no oath registered in Heaven to destroy the government, while I shall have the most solemn one to preserve, protect and defend it."...

This virulent hostility to the Union led the Old Confederacy to conclude — as expressed by South Carolina — that with Lincoln's elevation to the presidency, "the slaveholding States will no longer have the power of self-government, or self-protection, and the Federal Government will have become their enemy."

Federal government as the enemy.

Today there is a New Confederacy, an insurgent political force that has captured the Republican Party and is taking up where the Old Confederacy left off in its efforts to bring down the federal government. 

Read Colbert I. King's entire piece at the Washington Post.

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