Boehner Plays a Weak Hand

Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson defends the president's decision to insist on an approach to fiscal policy that includes modest tax rates for the wealthiest households.

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Speaker of the House John Boehner (YouTube)

Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson defends President Obama's decision to insist on an approach to fiscal policy that includes modest tax rates for the wealthiest households.

How dare he? President Obama, I mean: How dare he do what he promised during the campaign? How dare he insist on a "balanced approach" to fiscal policy that includes a teensy-weensy tax increase for the rich? Oh, the humanity.

Republicans are having conniptions. Witness the way House Speaker John Boehner reacted when Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner presented the administration's proposals on taxes and spending:

"I was flabbergasted," Boehner told Chris Wallace on "Fox News Sunday." "I looked at him and said, ‘You can't be serious.' I've just never seen anything like it. You know, we've got seven weeks between Election Day and the end of the year. And three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense."

The "nonsense" in question is a set of perfectly reasonable measures that Obama wants Congress to approve. Nothing in his package should be a surprise -- except, perhaps, that the president has opened this negotiation by demanding what he really wants, rather than what he believes would be convenient for Boehner to deliver.

Read Eugene Robinson's entire piece at the Washington Post.

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