Should Obama Have Called His Daughters Beautiful?

Clutch magazine's Britni Danielle takes up a blogger's complaint that President Obama's election-night depiction of his daughters as "beautiful" diminished their importance as girls and pandered to women. 

Posted:
 
barack_obama_sasha_malia_beautiful
McClatchy-Tribune/Getty Images

In a blog entry at Clutch magazine, Britni Danielle takes up a blogger's complaint that President Barack Obama's election-night depiction of his daughters as "beautiful" diminished their importance as girls and pandered to women.

... In the President's victory speech Tuesday night, Mr. Obama praised his family and told his daughters, "Sasha and Malia, before our very eyes, you're growing up to become two strong, smart, beautiful young women, just like your mom, and I'm so proud of you."

While most people watching let out a collective, "Awwww," [Alice] Robb, a third year student at Keble College, called the President's comments "inappropriate" and said the mention of the Obama girls' beauty "stung."

Obama's comments beg the question of why a girl's beauty should be source of pride for her father— and why beauty should be a value lauded alongside strength and intelligence.

The President may have been directing his comments at only two people, but he had the ears of the world, and on a day that should have been a triumph for women, his remarks stung ...

... I'm sure President and Mrs. Obama have taught their daughters that there is more to life than being a pretty face, but damn if it doesn't feel good when your dad marvels at you like you are the most precious, and yes, beautiful girl in the word.

I agree with Robb on one thing: Tuesday was a great day for women. The senate is now comprised of 20 female senators, and many anti-choice laws were beaten back by the electorate. But it was also a win for black women and girls who will have four more years of the Obamas and their beautiful girls in the White House.

Read Britni Danielle's entire piece at Clutch magazine.

The Root aims to foster and advance conversations about issues relevant to the black Diaspora by presenting a variety of opinions from all perspectives, whether or not those opinions are shared by our editorial staff.

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. 

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.