Romney Channels Obama on Foreign Policy

Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson says that he did not hear one concrete departure from the president's approach in the speech that was supposed to distinguish his Republican opponent. 

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Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson says that he did not hear one concrete departure from the president's approach in the speech that was supposed to distinguish his Republican opponent.

I wasn't surprised that Romney's highly touted Major Policy Speech on foreign affairs Monday offered few specifics. But even in its generalities, Romney's tour d'horizon sounded very much like a speech Obama might have given recounting his overseas initiatives over the past four years.

Romney pledged to "put the leaders of Iran on notice that the United States and our friends and allies will prevent them from acquiring nuclear weapons capability." Obama has repeatedly said the same thing, most recently in his address to the U.N. General Assembly last month, when he said the United States "will do what we must to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon."

Romney said he would "work with Israel to increase our military assistance and coordination." Obama has done just that, according to Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak, who said in July that "this administration, under President Obama, is doing in regard to our security more than anything that I can remember in the past."

Read Eugene Robinson's entire piece at the Washington Post.

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