Mitt Romney: The Great Projector

In a piece at Ebony, Michael Arceneaux calls Mitt Romney the great projector for trying to pawn off his political shortcomings onto the president by accusing him of making "wild and reckless accusations that disgrace the office of the presidency."

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In a piece at Ebony, Michael Arceneaux calls Mitt Romney the great projector for trying to pawn off his political shortcomings onto the president by accusing him of making "wild and reckless accusations that disgrace the office of the presidency." He says the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is actually projecting his shortcomings and failings onto President Obama.

If Mitt Romney ends this race as one of the most despised presidential contenders in recent memory, we should all be so lucky.

As ideally as it might be to favor a civil, meaningful debate about the future of the nation and who's best to steer it versus the nastiness we've been muddied in for two years now, one can't help but take at least slight glee in someone who consistently goes out of his way to be contemptuous be given a dose of his own medicine.

The former Massachusetts governor is entitled, power-hungry, and remarkably wishy-washy about who he is and what he believes. In fact, to say Mitt Romney is spineless is like saying the cast of Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is only a little bit uninhibited. Worse is that no matter what instance of legitimate form of criticism you level his way, Mitt Romney and the pacifiers he hired to run his campaign carry on as if nothing ever happened.

Actually, no, Mitt Romney doesn't simply carry on -- he turns the other cheek and proceeds to spit his troubles onto the opposition.

Therein lies Mitt's latest campaign strategy: "I know you are, but what am I?"

Read Michael Arceneaux's entire piece at Ebony.com.

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