New Rules Exclude Key Way Blacks Get Online

We asked ColorOfChange's James Rucker to explain why blacks and Hispanics who blog or use smartphones should pay attention to the results of a vote by the FCC earlier this week.

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Earlier this week, the Federal Communications Commission voted to adopt rules that will affect the way average people receive data and other content over the Internet. The results of the vote -- meant as a compromise between the interests of big business and the needs of "the little guy" -- are likely to have a disproportionate impact on minorities.

Dubbed "net neutrality" rules, they are meant to fulfill a promise that President Barack Obama made to protect a "level playing field" for all comers to the online space and prevent Internet service providers from blocking or slowing down Web traffic out of competition or greed.

The president said the vote "will help preserve the free and open nature of the Internet while encouraging innovation, protecting consumer choice and defending free speech." However, it seems that few others are thrilled with the results of the FCC's vote.

Republican lawmakers vowed to overthrow the rules, which they described as unnecessary regulation and a power grab by the government. The rules prohibit ISPs from blocking legal Web traffic, although they appear to allow providers to sell faster delivery speeds for additional money.

The rules also leave out wireless carriers, who provide Internet access to smartphones, among other devices. The sole African-American FCC commissioner, Mignon Clyburn, expressed reservations about that exemption because of the heavy reliance on wireless by minorities.

The Root asked James Rucker, co-founder of the online-activism (and pro-net neutrality) group ColorOfChange, why a number of grassroots groups are also unhappy with the FCC's new rules.

The Root: You've called the results of the FCC's vote a giveaway to the biggest corporate players. Why?

James Rucker: There are basically three big issues on the table. One is the prevention of paid prioritization, where an Internet service provider, based on who is sending [it] traffic, can put them on a lower tier or a higher tier. What that basically means is that if you have AT&T or Verizon and they're looking at Skype traffic coming across, they can say, well, this is Skype, a competitor to us -- we're in the phone business, effectively -- and we want them to pay more [in order for their data to go through at the same speed as the ISP's].

If you're Comcast, [you] could say to Hulu, which is providing video online  we're going to charge an additional fee for [it]. We're going to charge [the fee] to Hulu or the customer or whoever we want to. Or we're just going to prioritize that traffic differently: It will be slower; it will not come across at the same level of quality. So paid prioritization was one of the biggest issues that didn't get addressed [in the FCC rules].

Two, wireless is where most black and brown people are, and wireless was basically exempted from the net neutrality rules.

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