How Obama's Economic Policies Benefit Blacks

As part of The Root's series about how President Obama's policies affect African Americans, we take a look at the administration's initiatives regarding the economy.

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First, the law established the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. The only federal agency of its kind, the organization is tasked with ensuring the fairness of things like credit card plans, mortgages and student loans, and it has the authority to establish new restrictions on financial institutions as it sees fit.

What's more, the bureau will have lots of power over the lending and mortgage industries, thus giving it the controls necessary to prevent the sort of predatory lending that has resulted in black and Latino borrowers paying significantly higher interest rates than their white and Asian counterparts. Auto loans and payday lenders, which frequently take advantage of communities underserved by normal financial institutions, also fall under the bureau's purview.

Besides protecting America's most vulnerable consumers, Wall Street reform also includes efforts to open up the financial industry to minority workers. An underreported section of the law gives the federal government the right to end contracts with firms that don't show a "fair inclusion" of ethnic-minority and female staffers. In 2009 just 5.6 percent of the nation's securities, commodities and financial-services sales agents were African American. By improving those numbers, the administration hopes to influence a Wall Street culture that has often looked at minorities as little more than susceptible cash cows.

Cord Jefferson is a staff writer at The Root. Follow him on Twitter.

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