The Root's Talented Ten: Joshua DuBois

Executive Director, Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

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Photo by Marvin Joseph--The Root/The Washington Post

Joshua DuBois

Age: 26

Hometown: Nashville, Tenn.

Campaign Position: Director of Religious Affairs

Campaign Turf: Chicago

New Washington Gig: Executive Director, White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

 

 

Throughout campaign 2008, detractors accused Obama of harboring a messiah complex. If Hollywood ever adapts the jeers into a feature film, Josh DuBois would play John the Baptist. The senior political aide started out in Obama’s U.S. Senate office, which was then the only Democratic one to have a full-time staffer devoted to faith outreach. Before that, DuBois, a Princeton and Boston University graduate with a master’s degree in public affairs, was an associate minister at a small church in Massachusetts “looking for a way to fuse the two interests” of politics and faith. That’s when he saw then-state senator Obama speak at the 2004 Democratic convention: “When he talked about worshiping an awesome god, I said, ‘Well, here’s a guy who gets it.’”

He then worked with Obama on his widely praised 2006 “Call to Renewal” speech on religion in America, which DuBois calls “a watershed moment for Democrats and faith.” As director of religious affairs for Obama’s presidential campaign, he oversaw an unprecedented effort to reach out to regular churchgoers, whom Democrats had been losing for generations. He developed a curriculum for faith forums and voter house parties, and for online religious social networking and rapid response messaging—and he traveled across the country, to Iowa, Colorado and Montana and elsewhere, making the case that “it’s not just one set of political actions that define what religious means.”

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