DC-Area Schools Walk Out of Class in Protest of Trump

High school and college students rallied in protest of Donald Trump’s election as president in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. 

Students from the George Washington University gather outside the White House in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 15, 2016, during a student walkout in protest of Donald Trump’s election as president.
Students from the George Washington University gather outside the White House in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 15, 2016, during a student walkout in protest of Donald Trump’s election as president. Veronica Graves/The Root

One week after the presidential election, students from Woodrow Wilson Senior High School in Washington, D.C., walked out of class in protest of Donald Trump, CBS DC reports. Students from many other schools followed, and the protest went on to Trump’s D.C. hotel and the Capitol on Tuesday.

The principal of Wilson, Kimberly Martin, sent out a memo stating that students will be penalized for participating in the protest.

“School or district administrators were not involved in or consulted with during the planning of this event and students are expected to be in school throughout the day. Any student who leaves will receive an unexcused absence for periods they miss,” the memo reads.

But that didn’t stop the high schoolers from showing out.

In addition to the high schoolers, students at the George Washington University held a protest of their own against Trump, during which students of all backgrounds, races and religions marched from the campus to the White House, chanting slogans including, “Love trumps hate,” “Black lives matter” and “Build bridges, not walls.”

The Root ventured out to the GW walkout and captured video and photos of the hundreds-strong protest.

The GW protest was organized and supported by countless student leaders and organizations on campus, such as the Feminist Student Union, Black Women’s Forum and the GW Native American Student Association.

“We reject the white supremacist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, classist, and misogynistic rhetoric and policy proposals of his administration,” read a post on the Facebook event page for the protest. “The University must place the safety of its students first and foremost. Most of a University’s population now have their lives at risk. The University must protect us with every power it has available.”

“my body, my choice”




Read more at CBS DC.

Comments