Morehouse Senior, Originally From Zimbabwe, Selected as 2016 International Rhodes Scholar 

Prince Abudu was also recently accepted at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, where the academically gifted teen plans to pursue a master’s degree in engineering science.

Prince Abudu 
Prince Abudu  Fox 5 Atlanta screenshot

A Morehouse senior prepping for his own graduation is also a 2016 international Rhodes Scholar, adding yet another amazing achievement to his inspiring story.

Prince Abudu is no ordinary Morehouse student, having grown up on a small farm in Chegutu, Zimbabwe, where his mother did everything to help her academically gifted son get ahead, including sending him to boarding school, even though she made just $40 every two weeks. 

“She would go to the market in the morning and get a lot of citrus fruits that she would sell for a profit of $40 or $50. Bearing in mind that my fees are over $600, she had to do this several times,” Abudu told Fox 5 Atlanta.

Recognizing and appreciating his mother’s determination, Abudu did everything he could to succeed so that he could give back. 

“I couldn’t be irresponsible. I didn’t have that choice. It was built into my character because I wanted to change the situation for my family,” he said. 

His hard work got him noticed, and a foundation called Higher Life reportedly offered to sponsor his college studies, supplying airfare to Atlanta so that he could attend school at Morehouse College. 

“I had never left the continent or been on a plane before, so everything was a new experience for me,” Abudu recalled. “Once Morehouse happened and I got to Morehouse, I realized that I could dream bigger. I could think international. I could think of going global in terms of my aspirations.”

Abudu topped off those aspirations when he was selected as a 2016 international Rhodes Scholar in December and accepted into the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Abudu plans to pursue a master’s degree in engineering science at Oxford, where his focus will be on optical wireless communications, using light to transmit data signals. 

His endgame, however, remains unchanged: He still wishes to give back to his family in Zimbabwe. 

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