Howard Students Demand Better Treatment for Victims of Sexual Assault 

The protest, which broadly spoke out for safety for women on campus, was sparked when an alleged rape victim turned to social media to describe her upset at what she described as a lack of concern from university officials.

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Howard University students are taking back the night, speaking out broadly about safety for women on campus, after an alleged victim took to social media to describe her upset over what she said was a lack of concern from school officials, the Washington Post reports

According to the report, a crowd of students rallied Tuesday night outside a dorm at the HBCU where a woman said she was raped by another student, chanting, “No means no!” The social media campaign sparked from the protest—#takebackthenightHU—was trending on Twitter in Washington, D.C., the Post notes. 

On Tuesday afternoon, a spokesperson for the highly regarded historically black university issued a written statement, according to the Post, saying that the school was taking the issue seriously:

Recent tweets have been posted regarding the alleged sexual assault of a Howard University student by another Howard student. The university administration took immediate action as soon as we learned of this matter. While we are not able to discuss the specifics of any ongoing investigation, we are and have been actively investigating all reports that have been made to us. These cases cannot be adjudicated through social media without compromising the integrity of the investigation. Howard University takes matters of sexual assault very seriously. As part of our commitment to a safe campus environment, we continue to refine and enhance our Title IX protocols and procedures consistent with best practices and federal regulations. This is further supported with ongoing prevention education, collaboration, training and campus engagement.

The statement, sent in an email to the campus community, also included information about confidential university resources for students who may be in need of support. 

Read more at the Washington Post

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