‘Super Intoxicated’ Mont. Cop Pulled Gun on Asian Man He Called ‘an ISIS’ at Party 

Lewis and Clark County Sheriff’s Deputy Phillip Jay Clark is facing a felony charge of assault with a weapon after allegedly striking and pulling a gun on a fellow partygoer.

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A sheriff’s deputy in Montana who reportedly got wasted at a party is now facing a felony charge of assault with a weapon after attacking and pulling a gun on an Asian man whom he called “an ISIS,” the Helena Independent Record reports

Lewis and Clark County Sheriff’s Deputy Phillip Jay Clark, who was arrested Monday, is accused of pointing his gun at the man’s chest three times while his finger was on the trigger. 

The incident reportedly took place Dec. 4 at a nighttime bonfire after a bachelor party hosted by Clark and others. The victim, identified only as C.F., is a friend of Clark’s neighbor. 

C.F. reportedly told investigators that Clark was “super intoxicated” when he arrived at the bonfire. 

“He said that Clark ‘got a little bit violent and a little bit aggressive right away.’ He said it seemed like Clark wanted to fight. He said after shaking Clark’s hand, Clark ‘pulled out his gun, pointed it at me and then laughed, handed it to somebody else like we were about to fight,’ ” court documents detail. 

The deputy then allegedly hit C.F. in the ribs, asked him the capital of Thailand, then responded, “Bangkok,” and hit C.F. again in the groin before C.F. could respond. 

“C.F. had long hair on his head, facial hair and he’s half-Asian,” court documents note, according to the news site. 

Later, at the bonfire, Clark again approached C.F., called him “an ISIS” and  again pulled his gun. C.F. said that a friend told him to run, which he did.

“He said as he ran away he was ‘100 percent positive [Clark] was going to start shooting,’ ” according to the the documents. 

Clark’s bond was originally set at $50,000, but when he appeared in court, he was released on his own recognizance, under certain conditions, including a GPS monitor, the Record notes. An attorney representing Clark said that his client “was very surprised that charges were filed without an investigator talking to him.” 

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