MSNBC to Host Selma: 50 Years Later

The network will take a comprehensive look at the Alabama site of the 1965 voting-rights march, then and now, complete with live broadcasts from historic locations involved in the protest.  

Thousands march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., along with members of the cast of the movie Selma in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day Jan. 18, 2015. In 1965, King led thousands of nonviolent protesters on a march through Selma to the Alabama state capital in a historic civil rights demonstration. 
Thousands march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., along with members of the cast of the movie Selma in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day Jan. 18, 2015. In 1965, King led thousands of nonviolent protesters on a march through Selma to the Alabama state capital in a historic civil rights demonstration.  Sean Gardner/Getty Images

This weekend will mark the 50th anniversary of the Martin Luther King Jr.-led march for equal voting rights from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., and all weekend, on Saturday and Sunday, MSNBC will present Selma: 50 Years Later, a comprehensive look at Selma then and now, complete with live broadcasts from historic locations during the Selma marches. 

The network kicks off its coverage Thursday at 11 a.m. EST with live Twitter chats with music mogul Russell Simmons. On Friday at 12 p.m. EST, the network will host a Twitter chat with the co-founders of #BlackLivesMatter: Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi.

Melissa Harris-Perry will host her shows live from the historic Brown Chapel, which served as a meeting place and starting point for the march in 1965 and later became the meeting place and offices of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference during the 1960s.

Both shows will air at 10 a.m. ET Saturday and Sunday.

MSNBC will also carry the president’s remarks live from Selma as well as the first family’s walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, the infamous bridge where police attacked peaceful protesters during the 1965 march. MSNBC will also broadcast a re-enactment of the “Bloody Sunday” march from 3-5 p.m. ET Sunday. 

Viewers can also visit MSNBC.com for quizzes and facts about the civil rights movement.

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