Judge Joe Brown Doesn’t Think He Was Out of Line. He's Contesting Charges

The TV judge was sentenced to five days in jail earlier this week after reportedly being disorderly in court.

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Judge Joe Brown

Shelby County Sheriff's Office

Looks like Judge Joe Brown isn't going to take his contempt charges lying down.

In an interview with Good Morning America, Brown insisted that he hadn't done anything wrong, and he would repeat the actions that got him sentenced to five days in prison, The Associated Press reports.

According to him, he did something that lawyers "do every single day."

On Monday, while representing a woman in juvenile court who was there on a paternity warrant, Brown began to push for the case to be dismissed. According to AP, in audio obtained from the courtroom, Brown could be heard continuously challenging the magistrate, with the judge threatening to find him in contempt.

Brown paid no heed to the warning, continuing to raise his voice. So Judge Harold Horne made good on his promise.

"Now you want to get into this, let's get into it. This sorry operation needs to stop," Brown told Horne, apparently pulling out cash to pay a fine. Horne sentenced him to 24 hours in the Shelby County Jail, but the former television justice would hear none of it, continuing to argue. At the end of his outburst, Brown had accumulated five charges of contempt.

Brown has racked up his share of supporters, with his lawyer saying the judge's move took them all by surprise.

"I don't think he had any way to know that somebody would put him in jail," attorney Taylor Eskridge said. "This took us all by surprise."

"It was just preposterous and just insulting," supporter Julian Bolton added, according to the AP. "They could have just made him leave the courtroom."

However, the court's chief magistrate maintains that the action was perfectly acceptable.

"What I'm trying to get everybody to understand is that this isn't Hollywood, this is a real courthouse," Chief Magistrate Dan Michael said. "These are real cases involving real people with very serious problems."

Read more at ABC News.