Jesse Owens’ Gold Medal Fetches Record Price

One of the four gold medals won by Owens in the 1936 Berlin Olympics is sold for the highest price ever paid for a piece of Olympics memorabilia.  

Posted:
 
1386592361

Jesse Owens in 1936

CORR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

A 1936 Olympics gold medal won by Jesse Owens sold for $1,466,574 early Sunday morning, the highest price ever paid for a piece of Olympics memorabilia, ESPN reports.

Owens won the gold medal at the games in Berlin and later gifted it to his good friend, entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, who died in 1949. The estate of Robinson's wife, Elaine Plaines-Robinson, consigned the medal to SCP Auctions.

The final price shattered the previous record of $865,000 for a silver cup won by the winner of the first modern-day Olympic marathon in 1896.

SCP Auctions told ESPN that Pittsburgh Penguins co-owner Ron Burkle won the medal. Burkle also owns William Faulkner's Nobel Prize for literature, and the auction house told ESPN that Burkle has plans for an educational tour of the historic pieces.

With Adolf Hitler looking on as host of the 1936 Games, Owens, who was 23 at the time, won four gold medals, ESPN reports.

"We are honored to handle what we consider to be among the most inspiring sports artifacts ever offered at auction," SCP President David Kohler told ESPN. "Worldwide attention garnered by the auction of Jesse Owens 1936 gold medal and the extraordinary auction result proves that Owens' triumphant legacy continues to endure."

Read more at ESPN.

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.  

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.