The Republican Party's Shutdown Fail

In a bruising piece at the New York Times, Charles M. Blow writes that the 16-day shutdown of the federal government underscored "just how conflicted and dangerous" the Republican Party really is.

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Republican Texas Sen. Ted Cruz (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

In a bruising piece at the New York Times, Charles M. Blow writes that the 16-day shutdown of the federal government is emblematic of the danger and conflict that resides within leaders of the Republican Party.

Congress has finally worked out a deal to end the government shutdown and dodge default, but not before the Republican Party demonstrated to Americans just how conflicted and dangerous it is.

Benjamin Wittes, a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, this week described our current Congress as a greater danger to national security than Al Qaeda, writing, "We don't tend to talk about Congress as — at this stage — what it plainly is: the clearest and most present danger in the world to the national security of the United States."

That is what the G.O.P.-led House has brought us. Conservatives outside the chamber know defeat when they see it, and want to live to fight another day. But they beat their chests in vain as their laments fall on the deaf ears of the far-right political death squads.

On Tuesday, the conservative Wall Street Journal editorial pages blasted:

"This is the quality of thinking — or lack thereof — that has afflicted many GOP conservatives from the beginning of this budget showdown. They picked a goal they couldn't achieve in trying to defund ObamaCare from one House of Congress, and then they picked a means they couldn't sustain politically by pursuing a long government shutdown and threatening to blow through the debt limit."

Read Charles M. Blow's entire piece at the New York Times.

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