Shellie Zimmerman's Doubts Come Too Late

In a spot-on piece at Madame Noire, Charing Ball says that the time for George Zimmerman's wife to raise questions about his innocence was before or during his murder trial in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

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Shellie Zimmerman in court during George Zimmerman's trial (Joe Burbank/Pool/Getty Images)

The time for Shellie Zimmerman to raise questions about her husband George Zimmerman's innocence was before or during his second-degree-murder trial in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. They're immaterial now that he's been acquitted, Charing Ball argues in a spot-on piece at Madame Noire.

Well I see Shellie Zimmerman has been in the news, again.

From the article on the Today show's website entitled, "George Zimmerman's wife: 'I have doubts but I also believe the evidence:"

"In the midst of divorce proceedings against husband George Zimmerman, Shellie Zimmerman said she has doubts about what really happened in the shooting death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin last year, she told Matt Lauer in an exclusive interview ...

In many respects I do not envy the position she finds herself in, particularly being tied to a man involved in a crime, which has polarized a nation. With that said, I just don't understand how any of the recent developments are relevant to the Martin's case for justice.

Matter of fact, even her doubts of his innocence, particularly what he was capable of, are immaterial. The time to express that was when it mattered -- and that was before and during the trial. Or when poor Georgie might have asked you to perjure yourself before the court to protect the more than $130,000 in cash holdings you guys had acquired thanks to donations from the defense fund her husband set up on the Internet. I think to expose all of her reservations and his ill-doings now, particularly for the various news network, just sounds like bitter grapes.

Read Charing Ball's entire piece at Madame Noire.

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