Marissa Alexander and How Laws Devalue Women

In Salon magazine, Brittney Cooper argues that because laws don't do enough to protect women like Marissa Alexander, women often find themselves in dangerous situations where they are forced to protect themselves. 

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Marissa Alexander (Flagler Live)

In Salon magazine, Brittney Cooper argues that because laws don't do enough to protect women like Marissa Alexander from their violent husbands, women often find themselves in dangerous situations where they are forced to protect themselves. 

In Marissa Alexander's case, she inadvertently encountered her husband, a man against whom she had a restraining order, when she went to their home to retrieve her clothes unaware that he would be there. When he showed up, she felt threatened, went to her car to retrieve her gun, and then fired a shot into the wall in order to scare him away. Perhaps, this is why the judge also ruled that Alexander cannot use a "stand your ground" defense in her own trial.

The failure of the law to protect Marissa Alexander from her husband, who has admitted under oath to treating her violently, placed her in a difficult set of circumstances. There is no reason that she should be serving 20 years in prison for defending herself against a violent attacker. Yet, she was sentenced through a combination of overzealous prosecuting, by the same Florida district attorney, Angela Corey, who had to be convinced through national protests and marches to prosecute Trayvon Martin's killer, and extremely punitive mandatory minimum sentencing laws that require some crimes in which a gun is used to carry a 20-year sentence.

Yet again, Angela Corey, and the Florida justice system in general, seem to have a hard time distinguishing victims from perpetrators.

Read Brittney Cooper's entire piece at Salon magazine.   

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