How to Help Black Men Graduate From College

Dr. Donald E. Grant Jr., writing at Ebony, lists five ways that educational institutions can help black men graduate from college once they get there.  

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Dr. Donald E. Grant Jr., writing at Ebony, lists five ways that educational institutions can help black men graduate from college once they get there.  

In fact, according to a 2011 Congressional Black Caucus Foundation report, 45% of Black men over the age of 25 have attended college. Unfortunately, the rate at which these men go on to graduate from college is dismal. Only 16% earned four-year degrees.   

Millions of Black men across the country began college this fall. The degree aspirations of many of these men, however, are statistically likely to meet the same fate as the proverbial raisin in the sun. We do not have to stand by and watch this dangerous trend spiral out of control. There are five key factors that, if addressed, can shift this dangerous trend.

1) All public high schools must make the minimum necessities for college entrance and success readily available. High schools that educate Black students often fail to offer college preparatory tracks, advance placement coursework, robust college counseling or seasoned educators. We must demand that our public schools offer the basic courses for college enrollment and success. Exposure to college and its benefits must begin in elementary school, particularly with Black boys. Additionally, we must demand that our schools employ seasoned educators and provide a technology-based education. 

Read the Dr. Donald E. Grant Jr.'s entire piece at Ebony.     

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