Racial Profiling and Surviving the 'White Gaze'

For centuries, blacks have been reduced to constricting and false stereotypes that force them to move through social spaces in a way designed to put whites at ease, philosophy professor George Yancy writes at the New York Times.

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At the New York Times, professor of philosophy George Yancy writes an incisive piece about white people's fear of blacks, which he says is global and has origins in Europe. For centuries, black people have been reduced to constricting and false stereotypes that force them to move through social spaces in a way designed to put whites at ease, he says. "We fear that our black bodies incite an accusation," he writes.

My point here is to say that the white gaze is global and historically mobile. And its origins, while from Europe, are deeply seated in the making of America.

Black bodies in America continue to be reduced to their surfaces and to stereotypes that are constricting and false, that often force those black bodies to move through social spaces in ways that put white people at ease. We fear that our black bodies incite an accusation. We move in ways that help us to survive the procrustean gazes of white people. We dread that those who see us might feel the irrational fear to stand their ground rather than "finding common ground," a reference that was made by Bernice King as she spoke about the legacy of her father at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

The white gaze is also hegemonic, historically grounded in material relations of white power: it was deemed disrespectful for a black person to violate the white gaze by looking directly into the eyes of someone white. The white gaze is also ethically solipsistic: within it only whites have the capacity of making valid moral judgments.

Even with the unprecedented White House briefing, our national discourse regarding Trayvon Martin and questions of race have failed to produce a critical and historically conscious discourse that sheds light on what it means to be black in an anti-black America. If historical precedent says anything, this failure will only continue ...

Read George Yancy's entire piece at the New York Times.

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Sept. 19 2014 8:34 AM