Will Sybrina Fulton Be Remembered?

Mychal Denzel Smith writes in the Nation about Sybrina Fulton and her life after George Zimmerman's trial in the death of her son Trayvon Martin. 

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Sybrina Fulton speaks at a recent Justice for Trayvon rally. (Kena Betancur/Getty Images)

Mychal Denzel Smith writes a penetrating piece at the Nation about black women activists, through the prism of Sybrina Fulton and her life after George Zimmerman's acquittal in the shooting death of her 17-year-old son, Trayvon Martin. In the country's effort to "address the problem of anti-black racism, we neglect to consider the experiences of black women as part of that" narrative, he says.

Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, has been a textbook example of courage in the seventeen months since her youngest son was killed by George Zimmerman. Thrust into the public sphere during a time of great personal tragedy, Fulton has carried her pain with incredible poise. It was no different when she spoke before the National Urban League in Philadelphia this past Friday. She told the audience: "My message to you is please use my story, please use my tragedy, please use my broken heart to say to yourself, 'We cannot let this happen to anybody else's child.' "

In that moment, she made the connection between herself and Mamie Till, mother of Emmett Till, the teen slain in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a woman, even stronger. Speaking on her decision to have an open casket at his funeral after her son's face had been so badly beaten and disfigured he was unrecognizable, Mamie said: "I wanted the world to see what they did to my baby." These mothers of black sons publicly asked us to use their pain to seek justice. However, the way we use that pain cannot diminish the reality of the people who live with it. By which I mean, we have a bad habit of acting as if black women exist only as props in the story about black men and it's time to stop.

Black women's pain fuels but then becomes obscured in the popular narrative about the consequences of racism and the fight for racial justice, as it becomes framed through the experiences of black men. All of us who do work around these issues are guilty of this oversight, myself included. In our attempts to address the problem of anti-black racism in the US, we neglect to consider the experiences of black women as part of that story.

Read Mychal Denzel Smith's entire piece at the Nation.

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