Time to Redefine Millennials

Instead of casting wild-eyed glances at millennials, older generations could learn some life lessons from these, yes, industrious and tech-savvy youths, Maya K. Francis writes in a refreshing piece for xoJane.

Posted:
 
millennials_or_aug30
Generic image (Thinkstock)

Millennial Maya K. Francis writes in a refreshing piece at xoJane about, well, her generation. Instead of casting wild-eyed glances at the "me, me, me" generation, older folks should borrow a page from some of these, yes, industrious and tech-savvy youths. They could actually teach older folks some life lessons.

My first job out of graduate school was at a K Street public relations and strategic communications firm in D.C. My boss, who is around the same age as my mother, frequently capped the off-color remarks she made about me to whoever was listening with a matter-of-fact, “You know how these Millennials are.” This says nothing of the time a senior-level employee of a notable non-profit organization stuck a pencil in my face and told me to “Go sharpen it,” in a room full of people at the top of the client meeting.

That type of thing is hard to buy into.

Talk to a boomer about this type of thing, they’ll tell you, “It happens.” They’ll package it with a story about their own public humiliation and they call it “paying your dues” or “starting from the bottom.” Well, to quote another line from fellow Millennial and contemporary philosopher Aubrey Graham, you only live once.

I felt sorry for the people who had been so conditioned to accept and expect their own misery that their best offers were to advise me of the same.

“Why do I have to wait until I’m 65 to enjoy my life?”, I thought. “Why do I have to be a manager to have my work, ideas and contributions respected, even in an entry-level position? If so many hours of our day are spent working, shouldn’t we at least feel fulfilled in the work we do?”

Read Maya K. Francis' entire piece at xoJane.

The Root aims to foster and advance conversations about issues relevant to the black Diaspora by presenting a variety of opinions from all perspectives, whether or not those opinions are shared by our editorial staff.

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.  

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.
Must-See Family Attractions
July 29 2014 2:13 PM