Why Cornel West Is Wrong to Call Prisoners 'Precious'

Gregory Kane, writing at BlackAmericaWeb.com, had to consult his dictionary after hearing about the professor's latest remark -- that the criminal-justice system has nearly destroyed two generations of "precious" black men.

Posted:
 
cornelwest575ahj.jpg
Cornel West (Karen Bleier/ AFP/Getty Images)

Gregory Kane, writing at BlackAmericaWeb.com, says it's impossible to decipher professor Cornel West's latest rant -- that black male prisoners are "precious" -- because the argument is fundamentally flawed. Kane lists victims of some of those "precious" incarcerated men.

This column will be about West and the “p” word: precious.

Before [Cornel] West’s rant, I thought I knew what the definition of precious was. But after hearing the way he used it, I figured I was wrong.

"There’s a criminal justice system in place," West huffed, "that has nearly destroyed two generations of precious, poor black and brown brothers."

So those brothers now residing in the nation's jails and prisons are "precious," are they? ...

... In what will most certainly be a futile attempt to bring West back to reality, I’ve compiled a list of some of the black miscreants West finds so "precious."

1. Darrell Brooks: On the night of Oct. 2, 2002, Brooks kicked in the door of a house in East Baltimore. He tossed in some gasoline and then torched the place.

The family inside couldn't escape the inferno. Carnell Dawson and his wife, Angela Dawson, were killed. So were their five children.

You will never, as long as you live, hear West refer to Carnell Dawson, Angela Dawson or any of their five children -- all every bit as black as the criminals West’s heart bleeds for -- as "precious."

Read Gregory Kane's entire piece at BlackAmericaWeb.com.

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.