Prosecutors Dismissed Rachel Jeantel, Too

Taking the prosecution to task in the George Zimmerman trial, Lauren G. Parker writes at the Feminist Wire that the white men trying to convict Zimmerman implicitly devalued Rachel Jeantel's testimony by suggesting that the jurors look beyond her "unsophistication." 

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Rachel Jeantel, prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda and defense attorney Don West (Jacob Langston-Pool/Getty Images)

Taking the prosecution to task in the George Zimmerman trial, Lauren G. Parker writes at the Feminist Wire that the white men trying to convict Zimmerman implicitly devalued Rachel Jeantel's testimony. Parker says they did so by suggesting that the jurors look beyond Jeantel's "unsophistication" and lack of education in determining her credibility. 

The prosecution needed to represent Rachel Jeantel as much as they represented Trayvon Martin because her assumed unintelligence and subsequent worthlessness were inadvertently assigned to him. Aware of this, prosecution attorney Bernie de la Rionda attempted, but failed, to insist upon her credibility in his closing statements. Before queering a Dr. King quote by saying that she “should not be judged by the color of her personality but by the content of her testimony,” he told the jury that she was “a little unsophisticated” and “uneducated.”

By insulting her to gain credibility, he complied with the idea that she was insignificant and by default, so was Martin’s life. Such inherently assumed superiority over Jeantel from the prosecution’s closing statement, the defense’s humiliating tactics and venomous commentary from cyber voyeurs was deeply remnant of a passage from Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye in which Morrison stated:

All of us -- all who knew her -- felt so wholesome after we cleaned ourselves on her. We were so beautiful when we stood astride her ugliness. Her simplicity decorated us; her guilt sanctified us, her pain made us glow with health, her awkwardness made us think we had a sense of humor. Her inarticulateness made us believe we were eloquent. Her poverty kept us generous. Even her waking dreams we used -- to silence our own nightmares. And she let us, and thereby deserved our contempt. We honed our egos on her, padded our characters with her frailty, and yawned in the fantasy of our strength.

Read Lauren G. Parker's entire piece at the Feminist Wire. 

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