How Not to Derail the Dialogue on Race

If we're going to have this "national conversation" again, can we set some ground rules?

Generic image (Thinkstock)
Generic image (Thinkstock)

4. Remember that while “race” itself isn’t real, racism is, and our country’s long and well-documented history with racism has very real, lasting effects. Therefore, being “colorblind” is not helpful because it cripples our ability to deal with the tangible effects of racial inequality in just about every area of life.

5. Black people shouldn’t have to fit your definition of what’s respectable to deserve equality or justice. It’s silly and unfounded to blame inequality caused by institutionalized racism on, say, sagging pants or rap music. If you want to celebrate black people who are educated and high-achieving and defy persistent stereotypes, great, but that can’t be a requirement for fair treatment. We got into trouble with this type of thinking when evidence that Trayvon Martin was a normal teenager messed up so many people’s impression of him as a sympathetic victim.

6. Don’t defer to people like Bill Cosby about their theories about black people, any more than you would defer to a miscellaneous white celebrity about how white people are doing. If you need guidance, look for someone whose background offers evidence that he or she had the incentive to spend some time seeking information and thinking critically in a professional capacity about whatever it is the person is discussing.

7. Individual racism and systemic racism are two different things. We should care about all the structures that maintain racial inequality, not just individual actors. (This is why it’s not unreasonable to jump from George Zimmerman’s impression of Trayvon Martin to racial profiling by police.) That said, individual acts can provide strong reminders about larger attitudes and problems. Ahem, Paula Deen. Ahem.

8. Don’t give the word “racism” so much power that you can’t speak rationally after you hear it. Remember that the threshold for “racism” is a lot lower than being a member of the KKK and hating every black person you see. It means buying into and perpetuating things that support the idea of white supremacy. You can be a very nice person and still do that, even without meaning to. You can do it even if you have black friends. 

9. Resist the urge to believe and regurgitate myths about black people, even when they’re promoted by black people (African Americans are all more homophobic, black-on-black crime is uniquely bad, there are more black men in prison than in college, all black women love being fat, etc.). Take a minute to challenge the things you hear many say over and over. You’ll often find they don’t have a strong basis in reality.

10. Finally, stop thinking about and discussing racism as something that’s the problem of black and other nonwhite people. Remember that there’s an ever-growing movement of anti-racist white people concerned with dismantling white privilege. When you’re talking about racism, remember that it’s not just bad for those whom it oppresses; it’s bad for everyone because it creates an unjust society. When people want to fix racism, they do it not because they’re being charitable or nice, but because they’re being smart and decent.

Need race-related advice? Send your questions to

Previously in Race Manners:  “Black and White Kids: Different Trayvon Talks?

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