911 Call Allowed in Zimmerman Trial

Opening arguments kick off Monday. The 911 call will be allowed as evidence but audio experts will not.

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Tuesday, May 21, 8:10 a.m. EDT: Audio experts in George Zimmerman's second-degree-murder case in the death of Trayvon Martin disagree about the source of the screams for help captured on 911 calls, the Associated Press reports. One audio expert says in a report released today that the screams came from Trayvon, while another audio expert says the shouts were a mix of Trayvon and Zimmerman.

Thursday, May 16, 7:04 p.m. EDT: George Zimmerman's wife, Shellie, who is facing a perjury charge (prosecutors contend that she lied during her husband's April 20, 2012, bond hearing when she told a judge they were broke), has filed a witness list in her case. The list includes her sister-in-law and brother-in-law, the couple who helped her husband set up a fundraising website and manage the money they received, the Orlando Sentinel reports. 

Tuesday, May 14, 12:41 p.m. EDT: Florida prosecutors on Monday asked a judge to block George Zimmerman's attorneys from presenting information about Trayvon Martin's troubles at school and his marijuana smoking at the trial for the former Sanford, Fla., neighborhood-watch volunteer, calling it irrelevant, according to WFTV. Prosecutors also moved to bar any social media screen names that Trayvon used, the contents of his text messages and his school records.

Thursday, May 9, 10:43 a.m. EDT: In a May Daily Caller op-ed, George Zimmerman's brother, Robert, asserts that the NAACP "thrives off racially divisive controversies" and accuses the organization of "spewing fabrications laced with racial innuendo." The piece doesn't mention his own explicitly racist Twitter tirade against "black teens," in which he linked Trayvon to a 17-year-old accused of killing an infant. Read more at Media Matters.

Wednesday, May 8, 12:14 p.m. EDT: George Zimmerman, who has pleaded not guilty to a charge of second-degree murder for fatally shooting 17-year-old Trayvon Martin last year, is challenging the expected use of a voice-recognition expert at his upcoming murder trial. Trayvon's family claims that a voice heard on 911 calls made by neighbors during the struggle is Trayvon's. But Zimmerman's attorney filed a motion asking for a hearing to determine whether testimony from the expert would be allowed, and arguing that it could confuse jurors, Fox News reports. 

Read our last set of updates on the Trayvon Martin case here.

Read all of The Root's news and commentary about the Trayvon Martin case here

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