I'm Pregnant, and I Have a Mother-in-Law From Hell

An expectant mother tells writer Danielle T. Pointdujour at Ebony why she has concerns about bringing a child into the world while a war with her overbearing mother-in-law rages on. 

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An expectant mother has concerns about bringing a child into the world while a war with her overbearing mother-in-law rages on. She describes her battle to writer Danielle T. Pointdujour at Ebony.

From the minute I walked through the door she was on me. She attacked everything from my hair to my major at the time and shot rapid fire questions about my intentions with her son. At first, I thought it was the typical parental hazing and held strong through the fire, but when situations kept occurring as years went on I realized it was so much more. One particular incident, my future mother-in-law at the time, saw me out with a coworker having lunch on a nice day and called her son to tell him I was ditching work to have an affair. Another time she came to my apartment for a family dinner and criticized me so much that she and my mother nearly came to blows. Much like Mama Dee on Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta, she even tried to hook him up with other women behind my back. 

In the weeks leading up to our wedding, things actually seemed to cool for a bit, but just in case, I asked the pastor to skip the portion where he asks if anyone has objections. And he did, but that didn't stop her from running up to the altar and begging her son not to make this "mistake," getting carried back to her seat hysterically sobbing and eventually asked to leave. She tried to ruin the most important day of my life, so trust me when I say I hate this woman from the top of my head down to the marrow in my bones. 

Read Danielle T. Pointdujour's entire piece at Ebony.com.

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