Paula Deen: Keep Your Deep-Fried Apology

Following the firestorm surrounding cooking star Paula Deen this week, on Ebony Jamilah Lemieux lets the Georgia native know what she can do with her multiple -- and odd -- YouTube apology videos.

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Paula Deen and Kevin Bacon perform at Comedy Central Night of Too Many Stars in 2012 (Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)

It's been a whirlwind of a week for former Food Network star Paula Deen, who recently admitted to using the n-word with ease. In a matter of days, she's been publicly lambasted by black Twitter hashtags, fired from the Food Network and sparked a racial firestorm on the channel's Facebook page. At Ebony, Jamilah Lemieux writes in response to Paula's two surreal apology videos that no one wants to hear her say I'm sorry.

I'd be lying if I said I were surprised that Deen dreamed of being served by Black men dressed like servants and liked tossing around the word 'n*gger.' I'm sure someone will call that reverse racism but I won't waste the brain cells to pretend such an argument is worth considering (though if you are interested in sampling a Jambalaya of pathetic "The real racists are the ones calling Paula 'racist'!" logic, go hang out on her Facebook page).

Deen bailed on a Today Show appearance where she was to, um,  clarify (?) her words, citing "exhaustion." To be fair, getting dragged up and down the streets of Black Twitter would tire anyone out, let alone an elderly person. #PaulasBestDishes was better than anything she served up in a cast iron skillet sprinkled with bacon drippings and slave tears, I'm just saying. 

This story would be incomplete without the requisite Black friend caping up and saying that Deen can't be racist because she's got Black employees. Hi there, Pastor Tyson. How many bacon-wrapped chicken wings are worth your soul?

Read Jamilah Lemieux's entire piece at Ebony.

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