Another Take on NPR's 'Black Men Want a Relationship' Findings

Clutch magazine's Danielle C. Belton digs a bit deeper into the results of a recent NPR survey indicating that black men are more interested than black women in getting into a committed relationship.

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Clutch magazine's Danielle C. Belton digs a bit deeper into the results of a recent NPR survey indicating that black men are more interested than black women in getting into a committed relationship.

First of all, 18 to 49 is a really large swath of people. I don't know about you, but I don't know a lot of people near 50 who can relate to someone barely out of high school, let alone share their dating aspirations. Heck, most 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and older can't relate to the lovelorn elder teens of this world. So, I find this measure much, much too broad. What did men 18 to 24 say versus what men 25 to 30 said versus what men 31 and up said? Because I find it hard to believe they're all up wondering where they can find "true love."

Second, define "commitment." Commitment does not necessarily equal "marriage," which is what I know many of my friends, including myself, say they eventually want. Sure, I have no doubt that there are a-many man who thinks life would be easier if the rent could be split, if sex was easy and plentiful, if sandwiches were made and always abundant while still having that escape clause because nobody has any papers on each other.

Third, not a shocker that some women aren't looking for commitment if they've been in this dating environment for longer than five minutes and live in a major, metropolitan area on either coast. Or even if they're in the wilds of the Midwest or South. The economy is bad. It's every man, woman and infant for themselves. Love might be on the backburner whether you're in school, advancing in your career or just trying to make this rent. Sometimes you just don't have time and you have no desire to make time for dating.

Read Danielle C. Belton's entire piece at Clutch magazine.  

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